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#1 algonquin peak Posted by eyesofmoon on
Sun Jun 06, 20:11 EDT 2004

Hello there! What a nice site you have here!!!! I can't believe how nice a website you have and how informative and all. We climbed wright's peak and algonquin yesterday, 5-5-04, and when searching on the net I found your site! The views were fantastic yesterday and it's was 80 degrees in the afternoon, a bit hot for climbing, but nonetheless we had a wonderful time! Last weekend my son and his father climbed Marcy and that was great too but extremely windy!!! So much so it was as tho one might be blown suddenly off the top!!! If you would like to take a look at some nice pics from algonquin climb you can access them on my photo webpage at http://community.webshots.com/user/eyesofmoon Just click on newest albums at the top and then click on algonquin. Select slide show at the top, set at 2 sec intervals and then click play! We live in Lewis County just a few hrs south of Lake Placid so we drive north, climb and then drive back! Thanks for such a nice website and when we climb another peak, I'll leave you another message! Maybe we'll meet one day in the high peaks!!!!! My email is tahawis@hotmail.com and my name is Deb! Thanks again for such a nice site to have access to all this wonderful information!!! Bravo and Blessings to you too!

#2 Santonini Posted by Vicky on
Sat Jul 10, 13:25 EDT 2004

I am looking for someone(s)to hike the Santanoni's with. I am in decent shape. Hoping to finish up my 46th - Marcy! - next summer on my 46th bithday. Have only the Santanonis in my way. Anyone interested in exploring the possibility of climbing the three peaks in a single overnight sometime later this summer or early fall (2004)? If not htis summer then late next spring. Email me at vpillard@comcast.net

#3 Seward Range via Calkins Brook Posted by Rob Rathbun on
Thu Aug 12, 14:28 EDT 2004

August 8&9, 2004. I followed Andrew's hiking log directions (dated 5/30/2004). Everything was quite accurate directing me up this route EXCEPT the notation regarding blowdown: "there's a small amount of blowdown near the top". If that's a small amount of blowdown, I would not want to see a lot of blowdown. I climbed this with a full pack, which was quite difficult - taking it on and off to negotiate the blowdown hazards. Done in the rain of course. The Calkins Brook Trail connects with the herd path between Donaldson and Seward. I did not notice this going up and as I searched for the path to Seward I found myself retracing my steps down Calkins Brook. There is a little pink tape blaze diverting you toward Seward, maybe 400 yards from the descent off Donaldson. Note to other travelers going up or down Seward; the path is very ripped up and muddy, in some places very treacherous. Be careful in rainy weather; it's slick and somewhat dangerous. Otherwise it was a great route and worth a try. Rob Rathbun Plattsburgh, NY

#4 giant mountain Posted by greg on
Mon Aug 30, 12:22 EDT 2004

We were thinking of climbing Giant mtn but am hesitant because of the rain lately. We're rookies as far as climbing the high peaks. Would it be advisable to try Giant Mtn in the next week or so given the high amount of rainfall. Today is August 30,2004. Thanks. We're looking for feedback.

#5 Greg - re: Giant Mountain Posted by Rob Rathbun on
Fri Sep 03, 16:08 EDT 2004

Greg: Giant is not a route affected by the rain; very few bogs, etc. that are found on most routes. However, I'd avoid Labor Day weekend. But don't let the rain discourage you. You might want to follow the route up Giant via Washbowl and Nubble. Trail access is almost across from Chapel Pond. My email address is rathbun_robert@nlvmail.com Rob Rathbun

#6 Greg - re: Giant Mountain Posted by Rob Rathbun on
Fri Sep 03, 16:12 EDT 2004

Greg: Giant is not a route affected by the rain; very few bogs, etc. that are found on most routes. However, I'd avoid Labor Day weekend. But don't let the rain discourage you. You might want to follow the route up Giant via Washbowl and Nubble. Trail access is almost across from Chapel Pond. My email address is rathbun_robert@nlvmail.com Rob Rathbun

#7 Greg - re: Giant Mountain Posted by Rob Rathbun on
Fri Sep 03, 16:23 EDT 2004

Greg: Giant is not a route affected by the rain; very few bogs, etc. that are found on most routes. However, I'd avoid Labor Day weekend. But don't let the rain discourage you. You might want to follow the route up Giant via Washbowl and Nubble. Trail access is almost across from Chapel Pond. My email address is rathbun_robert@nlvmail.com Rob Rathbun

#8 GPS Track Logs Posted by Chuck on
Tue Sep 28, 07:08 EDT 2004

Are there other sites for High Peaks tracklogs? I was hoping to find one for Sawteeth before hiking it last weekend. Any suggestions for the best place to post the track log from my hike? Thanks

#9 New Beginings... Posted by Olga Kantor on
Mon Oct 04, 14:01 EDT 2004

Hi, I am 38, in average shape. I love hiking since my college years, but circumstances kept me from it all these years. I feel I need to get back to my passion. Please help me with any advice or recommendation to where, when, how..... I am a very quick learner, easy going and open to all suggestions. Thanks, Olga

#10 suggestions Posted by Andrew on
Mon Oct 04, 14:28 EDT 2004

Hi there. My suggestion is simply to look at the shorter hikes in the Adirondacks, and start with them. I've got many of them listed on my page (e.g. most of the sub-4000-footers I've got listed). Also important is making sure that you go with the right attitude and some basic safety equipment, like: compass, map, sunscreen, sunglasses, enough water, enough food, enough warm [non-cotton] clothes, including wind/rainwear, proper footwear (adirondack trails can be rough and an ankle-twist is easy to get). ...Andrew

#11 wright peak Posted by patrick on
Sat Oct 09, 13:43 EDT 2004

i was hoping to hike wright peak on sunday. what do you think the temp might be at the summit. also has there been any snowfall yet. thanks

#12 temp on Wright Posted by Andrew on
Tue Oct 12, 10:56 EDT 2004

Well... at this time of year you can expect the possibility of sub-freezing temperatures, for sure. If you go up while the forecast is anything other than warm and sunny, you should be prepared for the possibility of windy, icy conditions. ...Andrew

#13 High Peaks Posted by David on
Tue Oct 19, 15:27 EDT 2004

Hi Everyone! I'm on my way to becoming a 46er myself, having 11 more left to complete. My hiking partners of late have been unable or uninterested in joining me on my quest, so I'm here seeking new ones!I'm an experienced all-season hiker and I'm in-shape to boot. Here's what I have left: Marshall, Allen, Cliff, Redfield, Gray, Sawteeth, Seward, Seymore, Emmonds, Donaldson, Basin. I'd like to try to get one or two of the easier peaks this winter (Basin, Gray)and more or all of the rest next year. If you need some of these and are looking for a hiking partner too, drop me a line. If we overlap on some of them, I'm more than willing to return the favor. Thanks! David Colbert adkphoto@imagecrafterphoto.com

#14 This site Posted by Joe on
Sat Nov 20, 14:40 EST 2004

What a superb Dak site!! My compliments. I've bookmarked it. --Joe 3102w

#15 Posted by alistair on
Fri Dec 17, 13:26 EST 2004

Just found this site. Very nice,with great pictures and trip reports.

#16 Nice site! Posted by Joe on
Thu Feb 03, 12:56 EST 2005

Great site! Quite informative!
Thank you for putting so much info on the net for all to read!

#17 ??? Posted by Alex on
Thu Feb 17, 14:18 EST 2005

I would like to now if is too dangerous to climb marcy in february???

#18 climbing marcy in feb Posted by Andrew on
Thu Feb 17, 14:20 EST 2005

Well, if you are properly prepared with the right gear (this is important!), and the conditions are reasonable, then yes, of course it is ok to climb Marcy in winter.

#19 Crazy 8 Posted by Andrew on
Mon Apr 18, 14:30 EDT 2005

Andrew,

Truly enjoy your site. It has been in my favorite list for some years now because of the great beta you provide.

A small group of insanos like myself have decided to follow in your footsteps and do the crazy 8 this St Jean Baptist weekend. I have been training up for this in the sense that I have been jogging around 6-8km twice a week, and now I am biking 24k (min) about twice to three times a week. I will also be tackling some nice trails now that the weather is better.

Is there any training that you did to build up for this hike. Likewise are the any pitfalls and high endurance spots that you discovered during the day. I have hiked all of the great range in pieces so I know what is ahead of me, but the uber-endurance portion I have yet to experience. Please advise when you get a chance.

THanks in advance,

ANdrew

#20 re: Great Range Hike Posted by Andrew on
Mon Apr 18, 22:30 EDT 2005

Hi there.

Hmm... what did I do for training for that hike...? I recall just trying to get in a few >25km hikes under my belt to ensure that my feet wouldn't fall off and that my joints wouldn't rebel! Also, as you know, we had a friend meet us on Saddleback (about halfway) with a water resupply, although it turns out that we didn't need too much extra water.

Also, make sure that everyone in your group has a similar pace and is willing to take a similar amount of punishment (in case that's not obvious).

#21 few more thoughts on Great Range Hike Posted by Andrew on
Tue Apr 19, 08:53 EDT 2005

A couple of additional points that I find work well for me:

1 - bring lots of snack food, and stop often and eat small bits of your snack. In this way, you will avoid the dreaded 'energy bonk'.

2 - get started really early. We started at 2am or something like that. This ensures that you have lots of time to complete the hike before the end of the day. And the bonus is you'll be up on top of peaks when the sun rises.

#22 Homesick... Posted by Chuck on
Sat May 07, 01:21 EDT 2005

Hey Andrew! I've been checking in on your site since I stumbled onto it in August of 2004. My wife and I relocated to Kansas City, MO from Binghamton, NY over a year ago. I am 27 and have been backpacking the 'Daks since I was 16. Two days before we relocated, we headed up to say goodbye to Algonquin (sniff!). It is so flat out here...I miss my hills and good friends that hiked them with me. Thanks for all the great photos and the memories they bring back :-)

Chuck

#23 Algonquin Posted by Bob on
Tue May 24, 18:47 EDT 2005

Andrew,

Planning on doing Algonquin on June 11. What is the distance straight in from the lodge and back versus going around by Lake Colden. Thanks.

Bob

#24 Algonquin distances Posted by Andrew on
Tue May 24, 22:25 EDT 2005

Hi, Bob.

Well, let's have a look at the distance data for the last loop I did of Algonquin. Its on page 4 of the image gallery for that day.
(click here to go to that page)

If you click on the 'elevation profile over distance', you can get all of the data you want.

Let's see here.... looking at the graph, I see that via the Lake Colden way, it looks like 13.5-ish km (including Iroquois - without that it looks about 1.5 km less, so let's say 12km, or 7.2 miles).

And the graph also shows that it is about 6 - 6.5 km via the short direct route (or about 3.5 - 4 miles).

If you ever want to check up on other routes this way, just look it up in my image galleries. I almost always GPS-derived distance graphs that you can use.

...Andrew

#25 Gear that you use Posted by Chris on
Tue Jul 26, 15:19 EDT 2005

Wonderful site - I am planning my first ADK hike in August of this year, we are overnighting at the Feldspar Lean-To and plan on hiking Algonquin and possibly Marcy-Skylight (on different days). I especially love the plots and graphs you make and show on your website. What kind of gear do you use to get the data and then turn into the graphics? (what type of GPS, and the software that you use).

Much obliged,
Chris

#26 GPS Data Posted by Andrew on
Thu Jul 28, 19:09 EDT 2005

Hi there

I use a Garmin Etrex Vista C, and the software I use is called "GPS Utility" (http://www.gpsu.co.uk). It is powerful, and allows me to edit and graph tracks, but the user interface can take some getting used to. The tracklogs I give are in GPSU format but are completely text, and so you can read them with a text editor and get waypoints and trackpoints without using GPSU.

...Andrew

#27 Camping spots locations Posted by Matt on
Wed Aug 03, 17:20 EDT 2005

Hi Andrew,

My girlfriend and I are planning a week of hiking at a very aggressive pace and I need to know every (or most) location of areas where we can put our tent for a night. I have a map that shows the location of shelters but I know there are many places where we can sleep in a tent yet I can't find a record of this. Do you know where I can find this info?

Thanks!

#28 camping in the high peaks Posted by Andrew on
Wed Aug 03, 18:47 EDT 2005

Hi there.

The rules for at-large camping in the Adirondacks are (bits and pieces taken from the NYSDEC website):

-Except where marked by a "Camp Here" disk, camping is prohibited within 150 feet of roads, trails, lakes, ponds, streams or other bodies of water. (i.e. otherwise camping is allowed)

-No camping allowed above the 3500 foot elevation level.

-Lean-tos are available in many area on a first come first served basis. Lean-tos cannot be used exclusively and must be shared with other campers.

#29 Cliff, Macomb, S & E Dix Posted by Jeanne on
Tue Aug 09, 08:56 EDT 2005

I was wondering about accessing Cliff via the road to the Old MacIntyre Furnace Co then following 121 to the Interior Outpost. We tried to climb it last year when we hiked Marshall and Redfield, but we were told the blow down made the hike very slow going (and we didn't have enough time). So, we are trying to hike it as a single hike. Do you have any thoughts about this?

We also tried hiking Macomb, S Dix and E Dix two years ago (late June - bugs were awful), but actually couldn't find the path to Macomb because of all the spring growth (I assume, maybe it was just our "blindess"). Do you have any advise or would it be better trampled this time of year so we can find it more easily? We seemed to have made circles near the lean-to because we thought that's where the path began. We already climbed Dix and Hough (we could find the trail to Dix) so we don't want to reclimb Hough. Do you have any advise as to the best way back without going down Macomb (the descent down Macomb looks horrible -- I think I would like to avoid that). Thank you, Andrew -- any insights are appreciated.

#30 Cliff and the Dixes Posted by Andrew on
Tue Aug 09, 21:00 EDT 2005

Hi, Jeanne.

I'll try to answer your questions below.

I've tried both approaches to Cliff, both in winter. The approach from the uphill leanto side of the things was indeed foiled by a lot of yucky blowdown, and we turned around. A little later, we tried again, this time going up an alternate herdpath from flowed lands. This was much better, and blowdown was minimal. For the full details on all of this, you can visit the two recent trip reports I have for cliff. Here's how to do this:

On the left of this page, click on the 'annotated peak list'. Then click on the trip reports for cliff mountain (the links to the various trip reports are the dates of the climbs). In these reports, there are annotated topographic maps showing exactly where we went. If you have a GPS, then you can use trackpoints from my GPS tracklog to precisely locate the route up.


For the Dixes... Again, I suggest you go to my 'annotated peak list' on my Adirondacks page and look up my last climb of Macomb, Hough, East Dix, and South Dix. In there is an account of the climb and how we got up the Macomb slide, including annotated maps and some good GPS data (if you use the GPS co-ordinate of the start of the herdpath you can't possibly miss it. In any case, if you stick to the north bank of slide brook and follow that up, you'll be on the herd path at some point and then you can continue to follow that up to the slide, after which the going is more obvious.

Regarding a way down without going over Hough... well, I don't of any way other than over Hough to Dix or back the way you came. There may be other herdpath routes but I don't know of them. I have heard of a herdpath route down from East Dix to the east to Route 73, but don't know any details.

Hope this helps.

...Andrew

#31 Alice's Cabin Posted by Whitey on
Wed Aug 10, 11:08 EDT 2005

To All Prospective Vacationers,

If anyone is interested in renting a cabin in the Adirondacks, DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT patronize Alice's Cabin of North Creek, NY. Not only myself, but several other persons whom I've met, have had horrible experiences with the absentee landlord. From not receiving their security deposits back, to unsafe conditions in the cabin(no heat in January, homemade ladders to the 2nd story), to dead mice in the cupboards. There are plenty of other options in this most beautiful area of the world. No matter how cheap this place seems, its just not worth it.

#32 Cliff & Dixes Posted by Jeanne on
Wed Aug 10, 21:33 EDT 2005

Thank you for your feedback, Andrew. I will check the information you suggest and go from there. I think retracing our path back down Macomb might be okay, from what I can tell based on what others have said.

#33 xtra peaks Posted by Rachel on
Tue Aug 23, 14:56 EDT 2005

Hey all, nice site!

I am heading to Mt. Marcy with my fiance this weekend. We will begin the hike Sat morning and have through Tuesday to hang out in the woods. We will approach from the Loj via Marcy Dam and plan to camp at the base for a few days.

I've done Marcy twice before and know how challenging it is. My fiance is less of a hiker than I am, but also in pretty good shape. I would like reccomendations of other nice hikes in that general area --- possibly another peak to keep us going through Tuesday. Any ideas?????

Thanks so much! Rachel
PS feel free to email me: rjb6611@gmail.com

#34 trap dike Posted by rich on
Fri Sep 16, 10:20 EDT 2005

Just hoping to get out and do a hike this weekend. I was wondering if early October is too late to climb Trap Dike on Mt. Colden. I haven't done Colden yet so I thought this would be an intersesting way to do it. Your pictures of the climb looked pretty cool. Thanks a lot.

#35 Night Hike - Adirondack Loj to Marcy Dam Posted by Mike C. on
Tue Oct 04, 11:31 EDT 2005

This is a fantastic site! Extremely useful.

This weekend a few of us are headed off for our first High Peaks trip and are planning on Wright, Algonquin and Iroquois.
We have visions of setting up camp around Marcy Dam.

I hope this question doesn't sound crazy but, a couple folks will be arriving late on Friday; has anyone hiked from Adirondack Loj to Marcy Dam at night?

Thanks for any advice.
Mike

#36 hiking at night Posted by Andrew on
Tue Oct 04, 22:34 EDT 2005

Hi there... no, you aren't crazy. Just bring along some headlamps, and you'll be fine. After all, climbers have done serious peaks by starting off in the dead of night. All you have to negotiate in this case is a super-obvious wide path.

The bigger question is, will there be free spots available at Marcy Dam (likely, but there is always a slight risk).

...Andrew

#37 High peak winter climbing Posted by jason smith on
Thu Dec 15, 19:08 EST 2005

I am planning to summit a high peak in the winter, in march actually.
Does anyone have a recommendation. Also, will we need any special gear, other than the usual winter backpacking gear?

Was thinking of Algonquin. Thank you to anyone who would respond.

#38 winter hiking Posted by Andrew on
Thu Dec 15, 20:40 EST 2005

Sure, Algonquin is a fine choice. Just bring lots and lots of non-cotton winter clothes, including warm layers and a wind barrier layer. Recommend strongly to bring something to cover your entire head. There is a lot of exposed-to-the-winds terrain on top of Alqonguin.

You should bring snowshoes, and bring snowshoes with LOTS OF TEETH. If it is very icy, 10-point crampons might be more appropriate.

Of course, you should bring all of the other 10-essentials type stuff as well.

#39 Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Tue Dec 20, 15:45 EST 2005

Andrew,

This is the best website I've ever seen anywhere on anything.
I am dumbfounded by the amount of information available here.
Way to go.

Hope to run into you someday as I leisurely pursue "the 46".

Rookie (ADK forum)

#40 Andrew's Response Posted by jason smith on
Tue Dec 20, 15:48 EST 2005

#41 Andrew's Response Posted by jason smith on
Tue Dec 20, 15:53 EST 2005

thanks for responding Andrew. Do you like another climb better than Algonquin? I guess I wouldn't mind doing your favorite accent, with respect to vistas, wildlife opportunities, or great campsite opportunites, wouldn't mind hiking to a good Lean-to either. I know i didn't spell that right; so forgive me. Thanks again Andrew. I do appreciate the time you take to respond.

#42 re: winter hike ideas Posted by Andrew on
Tue Dec 20, 17:17 EST 2005

Well... Algonquin is a good intro because it isn't too long and the trailhead access is good (the short route via ADK Loj, I mean). However, regarding places with good campsites / lean-tos... perhaps the Lake Colden area? That has a lot of nice lean-tos, and you could climb Algonquin/Iroquois from Lake Colden. That's quite nice.

#43 Winter Routes Posted by Jack on
Mon Jan 30, 16:30 EST 2006

Hi there. Really great site.

I was looking to do a couple longish day hikes from Marcy Dam in late February. I've done a decent amount of winter camping and hiking, but never winter hiking in the 'dacks. Also, I've heard that avalanche conditions can exist... and I'd like to steer clear of that. Any suggestions?

#44 re: Winter Routes Posted by Andrew on
Mon Jan 30, 18:10 EST 2006

well, there are several really nice peaks in the vicinity of Marcy Dam. Namely:

-Algonquin
-Iroquois
-Colden
-Marcy

Now, regarding avalanche danger, I'd say the only place you'd have to worry about is Avalanche Pass (surprising, huh?). Although realistically even there I don't feel the danger is usually that great. If you are really worried about it, I'd suggest monitoring the weather conditions a few days before you go to see if there have been any recent significant weather events (i.e. a ton of snow, or a snowfall followed by a big warmup or rain - that kind of thing). Also, the high peaks info center (near where you'll start your hike to Marcy Dam) can probably tell you about any dangerous conditions like that.

Hiking through avalanche pass is really nice - one of the definite must-dos in the Adirondacks, and in the winter you can usually walk right across avalanche lake.

Hope this helps,
...Andrew

#45 Posted by Jack on
Mon Jan 30, 23:30 EST 2006

Yes. This helps! Thank you muchly.

#46 Banner photo Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Sun Feb 19, 13:06 EST 2006

Just out of curiosity, where was the the main banner photo taken? Which peaks are visible? I assume the large one to the left is Marcy.. any help would be appreciated thanks.!

#47 Banner Photo Posted by Andrew on
Mon Feb 20, 07:20 EST 2006

Hi there

The banner was taken on the summit of Algonquin. The highest peak somewhat to the right of center is Marcy. Left, of that, you can see, in order: Haystack, Basin, Saddleback, Gothics, Giant (plus a few other lower ones that are don't stand out). To the right of Marcy are: Gray, Skylight, and, in the very foreground, Colden.

...Andrew

#48 LOJ > MARCY > LAKE COLDEN Posted by Scary on
Tue Feb 21, 21:08 EST 2006

You've got a great website here, as you surely are aware. Thanks for that!

Anyways, I'd highly appreciate your insight: Say you arrive at LOJ on a Thursday night around midnight and plan to hike into around Marcy Dam or Avalanche Camp. Friday's objective is to hike Mt. Marcy and then redezvous at camp between Avalanche Lake and Lake Colden. What route would you take & why?

Thanks!
Scary

#49 Posted by Andrew on
Tue Feb 21, 23:19 EST 2006

Thanks for the website compliments!

It takes about 1 hour to get to Marcy Dam from the loj parking lot. Another 30 minutes from there to Avalanche Lean-tos. So you'll be arriving before 2am at your campsite.

If I read you right, you then want to hike up to a spot between Avalanche Lake and Colden and set up camp there, then set off for Marcy. Or, do you mean lug all of your backpack gear over Marcy (which would make the hike tougher)? Anyway, I can't tell which you mean.

If you don't mind doing a "there-and-back", then the most scenic way is through Avalanche Pass, past Lake Colden, and up the trail that follows the Opalescent. Very scenic through all of these areas. Then, up to four corners and on up to Marcy.

If you like loop hikes, then you can head up the Lake Arnold trail, cut over to Indian falls, then up to Marcy, and down the four corners / opalescent brook route to Lake Colden. This loop is perhaps a little more interesting because you get to see Indian Falls (nice lookout over to Algonquin) and the eastern side of the alpine zone on Marcy, along with all of the other stuff from the first option.

...Andrew

#50 LOJ>MARCY Posted by Scary on
Fri Feb 24, 13:46 EST 2006

I think we're going to end up lugging our packs over Marcy from the North. The view of Algonquin from Indian Falls sounds rad, spesh since we'll be hiking that peak the following day. Thanks!

#51 weather Posted by charles on
Mon Feb 27, 16:04 EST 2006

I spent Saturday Feb 25th climbing Upper Wolfjaw, Armstrong and Gothics. I was wondering if anyone had the weather history for the 25th-26th. It sure felt cold! Thanks

#52 Avalanche Pass Posted by Scary on
Wed Mar 01, 11:12 EST 2006

Is Avalanche Pass as difficult to negotiate as I hear?
Like expect a 1 mi per hour average?

#53 re: Avalanche Pass Posted by Andrew on
Wed Mar 01, 13:19 EST 2006

Well, in the summer it can be a bit rough and troublesome because there is a section where the trail goes up and down over some big boulders and what-not. This isn't a long section (we're only taking about maybe 2/5ths of a mile worth of trail). The rest is fairly normal Adirondack trail.

Now, if it is winter and Avalanche lake is good and frozen, then it is super fast and easy. Just walk straight across avalanche lake!

#54 Dogs Posted by Mark on
Sat Mar 04, 23:15 EST 2006

Hey Andrew,
First of all wonderful site loads of great information and pictures. I'm graduating from college the first weekend in august and am in the beginning of planning my trip that will be the following week. I've done some research and read that I can hike with my dog as long as he is leashed above 4000 ft to keep him of the rare vegetation and avoid certain privately owned trails. I hiked marcy, haystack, and aloquin about 5 years ago but I was wondering if you could give some advice regarding a few peaks that would be good choices for hiking with a dog. Any input would be greatly appreciated. Again thanks for the site its wonderful.

Mark

#55 re: good dog trail? Posted by Andrew on
Sun Mar 05, 04:11 EST 2006

Hi there.

hmm... I'm not quite sure what constitutes a good dog trail. What are you looking for? not much mud or boulders? not too long? are views important? (I'm guessing your dog probably doesn't care too much about far-ranging views!)

Let me know what your criteria are and I'm sure there is a trail that fits.

...Andrew

#56 re:re:dogs Posted by Mark on
Sun Mar 05, 11:03 EST 2006

Andrew,
Just something a lab would physically be able to do. Im not concerned about length this dog and i have been on multiday hikes together and hes in better shape than I will ever be. Just trails or peaks that dont have any verticle climbing. Views aren't terribly important Im in it more for the adventure and feeling you get when standing on the top and my dog just cares about being outside. So when i say good trails, I just mean trails that dont have any attributes that make it actually impossible to climb. Thanks again.

Mark

#57 re: hikes for Dogs Posted by Andrew on
Sun Mar 05, 21:27 EST 2006

ok... based on that, there are many hikes. Phelps, Wright, Tabletop, Cascade, Porter, Skylight, Colden (from Lake Arnold), Street, Nye...and many more. It would be easier to state the ones that might be harder for a dog:

Haystack, Basin, Saddleback, Gothics. Basically anything with a scramble or with any ladders (I can't remember all of them).

Also in some private areas in the high peaks dogs are not allowed (e.g. the AMR club does not allow dogs on its territory, so that would essentially nix Colvin/Blake/Dial/Nippletop).

#58 Re: dog Posted by Mark on
Mon Mar 06, 01:18 EST 2006

Andrew,
Thanks for that information, thats what i had in mind, trails with ladders and such. Only one more question, im taking a first time adirondack hiker with me, and he'd like to do marcy simply because its the highest. Do you recall enough of that trek to know if that would be doable? I probably will not post again, so thank you very much for the input and all the great information on your webpage, it really is great.

Mark

#59 re: Marcy Posted by Andrew on
Mon Mar 06, 08:05 EST 2006

Marcy is definitely do-able. BUT... it is long (16 miles round trip) and there is significant terrain that is expose to the elements above treeline. You need to make sure that this new person is prepared for a tiring, long hike AND make sure they have the right equipment and gear to not freeze up there!

Of course, this is all assuming you are going up in the winter. Although even in the summer it is a pretty big hike.

#60 Thanks Posted by Mark on
Mon Mar 06, 14:42 EST 2006

Andrew,
Thanks for all the great feedback, its great to be able to plan my trip out including planned peaks before I get there haha. We wont be going until this summer so the snow, ice and wind won't be an issue. Thanks again for the site and information It is appreciated. If I can get my dog on marcy and skylight Ill send ya a picture haha.

Mark

#61 trials Posted by Mark again on
Mon Mar 06, 18:42 EST 2006

Hey Andrew,
I know I said I was done but i thought of something else. If i buy the Guide to Adirondack Trails: the high peaks region guide book will it tell me trails that are AMR property since i plan on having a dog with me and they do not allow that? Thanks once again

Mark enjoy Utah

#62 re: AMR land Posted by Andrew on
Mon Mar 06, 19:26 EST 2006

The map that comes with the guidebook does show AMR land, I believe. You can even buy the map separately.

#63 Giant Posted by Gregg on
Mon Mar 13, 16:58 EST 2006

Climbed Giant fromm Rt 73 (Roaring Brook Falls) on March 11, 2006
Excellent views of surrounding ranges from the top. Clear and cold, 32F with steady wind ~10-20mph. Crampons were a necessity, with many stretches of solid ice for 30-40 yards. A lot of the trail was hard packed snow, especially 1/2 way up and to the top. Off the trail, the snow was 3 to 4 feet deep. The lower section of trail from Rt 73 was variable. At 0800hrs, trail was mostly frozen solid with some ice and just plain dirt/ rocks. However, on the return from the top,(1:30pm) conditions had begun to thaw out. Once we were ~ 1/2way down our coats were off, and the ice was beginning to melt but still needed crampons. Towards the last
1/3 of the return trip the ground was very soft, especially where exposed to sun. I suggest that anyone attempting this climb form now until spring, should take crampons and be prepared to use them.
It was a blast! Have fun!

#64 Wright Slide Posted by T-Rex 56 on
Wed Mar 15, 17:10 EST 2006

Andrew,I've found your website to be a great resource for my own trips.Thank you.My inquiry is regarding directions to the base of the Wright Slide.This is the slide that is visible from Marcy Dam.You submitted a photo of this slide on one of your Phelps Mtn. trip logs.Upon enlagement,I could see boot tracks leading up the slide and snowboard tracks coming down.I've been told of a ski trail that is accessible from somewhere off the Wright Peak Ski trail.Does this ski trail originate from "The Whale" and can I access the bottom of the Wright Slide from it?

#65 re: Wright Slide Posted by Andrew on
Sun Mar 19, 23:45 EST 2006

hi there.

I don't really know much about this particular slide or if there is a good herdpath leading to it - perhaps someone else reading this forum could comment?

...Andrew

#66 Wright Slide Posted by T-Rex 56 on
Mon Mar 20, 20:27 EST 2006

Andrew, we found our way to the Wright Slide fairly easily .From the third lean-to at Marcy Dam, we bushwhacked paralleling the left side of a large ravine to around 3000 feet.From this point we could see the bottom of the slide through the woods.The Wright Slide is beautiful and very wide ,with two options for climbing..We took the left slide up to the top at 3675 feet.The views of the Whale Ridge and Phelps Mtn. were a nice surprise.Hope to speak with you again soon.

#67 Climbing the 46ers Posted by Russ on
Thu Mar 30, 15:45 EST 2006

I'm starting my quest to climb all the 46ers in April. Can someone tell me where I can find info on what is the best orders to climb them? All I can find is start with Cascade. I figure to leave the bushwhacks till last, but am lost as to whats in between the easiest and hardest?

#68 order of climbing Posted by Andrew on
Thu Mar 30, 17:39 EST 2006

Hi there

Well, I don't think there really is any proper order in which to climb the 46. Certainly I wouldn't start with a no-view trailless peak right at the start; better to get the sense of the land and to get a few nice views!

But on the other hand, I wouldn't leave all the trailless peaks to the end. I think saving some of the really pretty trailled peaks to near the end gives you a more balanced experience. Plus, I view it as the equivalent of 'saving the best for last'.

I'd advise a mix: a few easy trailed peaks, then switch back and forth between some forested peaks, more remote peaks, and trailled and/or more scenic peaks.

#69 First Time in Daks Posted by franklen on
Tue May 02, 11:09 EDT 2006

Looking for tips on getting the best out of our first trip to the Adirondacks May 8-14. We (wife and I) will be hiking from the Loj for Algonquin Peak (splitting it into two days and staying overnight on the way up), then spending 2-3 days exploring the general area of Lake Placid and the High Peaks. Any general info appreciated. Also, will we need crampons at this time of year?

#70 re: crampons Posted by Andrew on
Tue May 02, 23:03 EDT 2006

Hi there.

Since you are doing algonquin already, I suggest the excellent loop hike over Algonquin, tag Iroquois, and then down and return via Avalanche pass. Or, do it in the reverse direction. That's a nice outing.

Normally I'd say bring crampons for sure, but the snow and ice seem to be melting fast. I'm not sure you are going to need any snow and ice gear at all by mid-may! Check the trail conditions page at Views from the Top (see the 'links' section at the left) before you head out.

...Andrew

#71 Day trip Posted by Mark on
Mon May 15, 19:58 EDT 2006

Hey again Andrew,
I have a cousin who lives about 2 hours south of the adirondack mountains who is getting married in June. Since that gives me an excuse to travel from central PA to upstate NY I figured Id take an extra day for the weekend and make a day trip up to the mountains. I was wondering If you had any good suggestions about what peak (or two) to do and where to start from. Also, (I can wait and see, I was wondering what the conditions are typically like in the middle of June so I can go prepared. Thanks for any feedback you can provide. Any chance youd be heading up there in the middle of June maybe Id run into you up there?

#72 Whiteface Posted by Chantalle on
Thu May 18, 15:57 EDT 2006

Hey,

I know Whiteface is usually a day trip. But my roomate and I wanted to take our time. Is there any camping on this mountain? and if so, where would we find it? bottom? middle? and which trail would be the best to take?

Thanks for any info you can give me.

#73 Giant Posted by Fred on
Fri Jun 09, 19:17 EDT 2006

Hi-
Very informative website! We are planning on climbing Giant mountain in July. We did Algonquin last summer, and I was just wondering how the two trails compare in difficulty. I realize Giant is shorter, but steeper, so I am trying to get a good idea of how it will compare to the Algonquin trail. Thanks!

#74 re: Giant Posted by Andrew on
Sat Jun 10, 10:35 EDT 2006

Hi there.

I think you will not find it any more difficult than the trail up Algonquin. My recommendation is to take the 'ridge' trail that goes up from near Chapel Pond. Much more scenic than the Roaring Brook trail.

...Andrew

#75 Sewards via Calkins Brook Posted by Kubu on
Wed Jun 21, 18:21 EDT 2006

Hi Andrew,
We are planning to climb the sewards via Calkins Brook on this weekend. It is our first time to use the GPS unit (eTrex Vista) on a hike. I am wondering how many waypoints we need to creat a good route to nagivate. Would it be sufficient to have waypoints at only key junctions or I need waypoints for every 0.5-1km?

I am thinking to use some of your trak summary from your website. You have two climbes:2004 and 2006. Which one would be better to use?

Your web site has been incredible information source for us to complete 46. Thanks!

#76 re: Sewards Posted by Andrew on
Wed Jun 21, 21:09 EDT 2006

To be on the safe side, I would include points every .5 or 1km, actually. Although you can get by with just the major intersections, it is always best with trail-less peaks to have extra insurance! (although the herdpath is fairly easy to follow in this case).

As far as which track to use, I'd say either one. The summer (i.e. the earlier) one probably has a better track leading from Donaldson to Seward (as I recall in the winter I had a slight bit of off-herdpath bushwhacking at that point).

And finally, thanks for the compliments on the website. Glad you find it useful.

...Andrew

#77 hough Posted by carl on
Fri Jun 23, 18:55 EDT 2006

Do you have any idea if the lillian brook herd path to Hough is passable now?
I am planning on doing Hough sometime in the next week.

#78 re: lillian brook herdpath Posted by andrew on
Sun Jun 25, 16:37 EDT 2006

Hi there.

I've never actually done the lillian brook herdpath - so I can't comment on it myself. However, perhaps others who are reading this and who might know will respond...

#79 Re:Seward Posted by Kubu on
Mon Jun 26, 19:43 EDT 2006

Hi Andrew,
Thank you for your message. We climbed the Seward via Calkins Brook herd path and descended via the Ward Brook herd path. The Calkins Brook herd path was really nice. Thanks to your picture of the horse trail/herd path junction, we were able to spot it easily and crossed the brook at the right location. For some reason, the coordinates from your trak log were off on my GPS. We were not able to use the route. What do you think we can do to correct it?

It was unfortunate, but I strained my ankle on a way down from Seward. The Ward brook herd path condtion was really bad, and I probably was getting sloppy due to some fatigue. We should have used the Calkins Brook herd path to return...I hope it will be better in two weeks for another hike in Adirondack.

#80 re: GPS coordinates Posted by Andrew on
Tue Jun 27, 07:49 EDT 2006

Hi there.

Glad to hear your trip went well (minus the ankle problem, of course).

The only thing I can think of regarding the GPS data is that perhaps your map datum in your gps was incorrectly set. It should be set to WGS84, since my tracklogs are stored with that map datum.

Another possibility is that my tracklog wasn't stored using that map datum.... no, just checked - they look ok.

#81 Rain Posted by Scary Monster on
Wed Jun 28, 15:54 EDT 2006

andrew,
my boys and i are headed into loj tomorrow night. we're hiking over algonquin down to coldin lake to camp, and then planning to go up avalanche pass and then back down to panther gorge eventually to camp. and then out on sunday... do you have any idea if there's flooding to consider. down here in philly everyone is flooding!
matt

#82 rain Posted by Andrew on
Wed Jun 28, 17:52 EDT 2006

Hi there

Can't say positively for sure about flooding, but I imagine you'd be ok. I can't see any spot along that loop being all that vulnerable.

Still, to be sure, I'd check with the folks in the ADK High peaks center near the Loj and see what they have to say.

#83 rain Posted by Andrew on
Wed Jun 28, 18:37 EDT 2006

Hi there

Can't say positively for sure about flooding, but I imagine you'd be ok. I can't see any spot along that loop being all that vulnerable.

Still, to be sure, I'd check with the folks in the ADK High peaks center near the Loj and see what they have to say.

#84 Gray from Marcy Posted by Kubu on
Fri Jul 14, 03:43 EDT 2006

Hi Andrew,
I have a question about a herd path between Gray and Marcy. Recent trip reports and posting in the Adirondack Forun indicate it is incredibly thick, and following the path from Marcy to Gray is more difficult than from Gray to Marcy. We will climb up Marcy from the JBL area via Phelps trail first. We are wondering if we should go down to Lake Tear and follow the more defined path from there instead. What would be your time estimate
-if we take a herd path between Marcy and Grey
-if we go down to Lake tear and back

We have never climbed on that side of Adirondack yet and do not have a good idea how hard a trail is.

When we take this route, we will descend via the Opalescent trail, correct? I heard this trail was steep (maybe compared to the Van den Hogen trail). If you compare the Opalescent trail with the Ore Bed trail to the Gothic-Saddleback col., which is steeper? My ankle has not been still 100% healed yet.

I figured what was going on regarding GPS coordinates. When I copied the waypoints of all 46 peaks and major trailheads to the Mapsource, they got modified! A little winodw appeared and told me that the waypoints transferred were using the older version (system?) of the Mapsource and needed to be modified. I guess if the version is different, there are slight differences in the coordinates. It made a sense. If this is correct, I will not be able to use your coordinates to figure out the route between the Gray and Marcy.

Kubu

#85 re: Gray and Marcy Posted by Andrew on
Sat Jul 29, 11:50 EDT 2006

Hi - sorry for the delayed response... I was on vacation!

The herdpath from Gray to Marcy is indeed narrow and overgrown, but it is followable, once you are on it. The most important thing, if you are coming from Marcy to Gray, is to locate the start of the herdpath at the edge of treeline. When I was there last there was a cairn marking the spot.

Regarding my waypoints... I'm not sure what mapsource is talking about or why it is translating/moving waypoints (unless it is some sort of datum difference between the datum the waypoint was saved in and the datum your mapsource is set to).

You might want to have a direct look at the ASCII tracklog of the gray-marcy portion of my traverse. Since it is in ASCII (i.e. readable) form, you can see what the waypoints are and what the datum is (which I believe is WGS84) and manually input those directly into mapsource or into your GPS. That way you know no translations have occurred. (The tracklog is available in the trip report for my Gray-Marcy climb).

#86 re: opalescent trail Posted by Andrew on
Sat Jul 29, 11:50 EDT 2006

Oh, one more thing... the Opalescent trail is not any steeper than any of the other approach trails, as far as I'm concerned.

#87 Marcy/Gray Posted by Kubu on
Sun Jul 30, 20:43 EDT 2006

Hi Andrew,
How was your vacation? I hope you have had a great time. If you did some outdoor activity during your vacation, I would be looking forward to hearing your trip report on your website.

Regarding the hike, we could not do it today because we hiked Haystack, unexpectedly, Basin, and Saddleback (I was told doing these two would be a bad idea with my injured ankle, so I was very hesitant) yesterday. Phelps trail condition was not that great on our way to Haystack yesterday, and a heavy shower in the afternoon/evening probably made the trail worse. We were fortunate that downpour did not occur until we started descending the Saddleback. The trail from there to the ladders in the Ore bed trail became a big stream.

Since we were unable to hike Marcy first, I was re-thinking the plan. What would be the best way to do these peaks: Skylight, Gray, and Marcy? It seems we can do this from either Loj or the upper works trailhead. I have no idea which one is better choice for us. I know you have done Skylight and Gray/Marcy/Tabletop as a day hike from the South meadow trailhead, and you have some experience with the Upper works trail, also. We climbed the Van Hoevenberg Trail up to the Indian Fall before and had no experience in the Upper Works trailhead. If you can give us some recommendation, I will apprecaite it.

Kubu

#88 Marcy/Gray Posted by Kubu on
Sun Jul 30, 21:17 EDT 2006

Sorry, Andrew, one more thing about the herd path. Is it true that there is a cliff (5 feet jump involved??) to negotiate on a herd path between Gray and Marcy? I am afraid of heights (that is why I climbed the Saddleback wall instead of climbing down) and unfortunately, I am very short (5'2") for the jump. If this section is a problem, I think I should take a conventional trail to reach Marcy.

#89 herdpath and upper works Posted by Andrew on
Mon Jul 31, 18:48 EDT 2006

Hi there.

You know, I think the upper works trailhead access might be a bit easier because you don't have to endure any elevation loss along the way (it is uphill the whole way) and you don't have to go through the rough terrain around avalanche lake.

Regarding the 'cliff' on the herdpath between Marcy and Gray - I recall a small step (as you say, maybe 5feet), but I don't at all recall it being exposed (i.e. scary) or hard. if you are going with another person, I'm sure that they could give you an assist up or down if you had a hard time with it. certainly it is not nearly as big as the cliffy part on the west side of Saddleback, not even close.

...Andrew

#90 Van highway to Marcy/Gray? Posted by Kubu on
Mon Jul 31, 19:22 EDT 2006

Hi Andrew,
Thank you for more information about the route. I was relieved to hear the rock face would not be as bad as one in Saddleback. Yes, I am going with my husband, so it should be ok. After reading horrible accounts about the trail from Lake Arnold to the Lake Tear (many said logs were floating on the trail, especially on the Feldspar trail at the moment), I came up with a plan to avoid the Feldspar trail completely:
Go up Marcy via Van Hoevenberg Trail-go down to 4 corners-Skylight-Lake Tear-Gray-Bushwhack back to Marcy-Van Hoevenberg back to Loj

I am guessing footing and elevation gain would be much gentler using the Van Hoevenberg trail than the trail from Upper Works. I learned taking extra miles on a better shaped trail would be much more important than just heading down on a bad, steep trail when I injured. What do you think about a plan above? Do you think it is doable?

Kubu

#91 re:Van highway to Marcy/Gray? Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Mon Jul 31, 23:58 EDT 2006

#92 re:Van highway to Marcy/Gray? Posted by Andrew on
Tue Aug 01, 00:01 EDT 2006

Hmm... floating logs, eh? Sounds like pretty yucky trail conditions. I think your best bet is to have a close look at the trail conditions of the various trails (from the sources you've already used) and pick which ever looks best. I personally don't like the Lake Arnold way because the way up and down from Lake Arnold is a bit bouldery and I don't like that much, and you have to go all the way up to the elevation of Lake Arnold and then lose a whole bunch before you start your ascent up to Lake Tear of the Clouds.

But... as you say, difficulty is not just elevation gain and loss, but also includes trail conditions - so again, I haven't been in the 'daks for the last month, so maybe some of the people who are reporting trail conditions know better.

Good luck!

...Andrew

#93 Gray/Marcy herd path Posted by Kubu on
Tue Sep 05, 21:39 EDT 2006

Hi Andrew,
I apologize for writing back to you late, but my husband and I completed the Marcy-Skylight-Gray trip on a last weekend of August. We were able to follow the herd path from Gray to Marcy. It was not as hard as I imagined. Your reply to my question earlier definitely boosted my confidence to take this route. Thanks!

#94 Hike w/dog Posted by Mark on
Fri Sep 08, 03:38 EDT 2006

Hey Again Andrew,
Just wanted to let you know the hike I was planning way back in January finally came to be. My dog, two friends and I drove 8 hours up to the adirondacks on August 7th. We stayed until thursday and took a leasurely hike from south meadows past Marcy Damn, and camped at Lake Colden/Flowed Lands via avalanche pass in the coming days we did Marcy, skylight, colden and phelps. We all had a great time and I introduced to good friends and a dog to the joys of the adirondacks. I must admit though, my dog and I were exhausted from the trip, I like to tell myself I wouldve done better had I not had to carry him up and down so many ladders around Avalanche Lake. hahaha thanks for all the advice back in January.

Mark

#95 re: Hike w/dog Posted by Andrew on
Fri Sep 08, 08:01 EDT 2006

Hey there. Congrats on your hike. One thing I've noticed about Avalanche Lake is that it is much easier in the winter when you can just cruise along on the nice flat frozen surface of the lake. Not sure how your dog likes walking on ice, though!

#96 Seward Range Posted by Arielle on
Thu Oct 05, 12:31 EDT 2006

I am planning on doing the seward range this weekend to add to my list of 46ers i was just wondering how long it will take to do all three and what is the easyist way to do it?

#97 re: Sewards Posted by Andrew on
Thu Oct 05, 22:21 EDT 2006

I personally think the easiest way to do the sewards is via the Caulkins brook trail. The distance is about 26km (15-16 miles), total, and at a reasonable pace it takes about 10-11 hours.

I have two trip reports for these peaks, one only via the Caulkins brook trail and the other a loop trip going up the Caulkins brook route and down the regular route up Seward. Have you looked at these yet? You may find them useful.

#98 Sawteeth - Current Conditions Posted by ADK Hiker on
Thu Nov 02, 16:10 EST 2006

Hello, I am thinking of doing Sawteeth this weekend and am looking to see if you know what conditions are like. I saw these photos of Three Brothers from a week ago (http://www.photosoftheadirondacks.com/Albums/thebrothers/threebrothers/index.html) and am assuming that Sawteeth will have snow as well. Does anyone know? Will I need snowshoes?

Also, I read in the guidebook that Trail #37 (Pyramid Gothics Trail) has a "steep cleft in the rock face with poor footing". I'm wondering how bad this might be this time of year, covered in ice? Would I need crampons? Or should I be able to get up in just boots?

I'm thinking of doing the loop, going up Trail #35 to #37 (Pyramid Gothics Trail) and coming down Trail #36 (Scenic Trail). Is that the best way to do the loop?

Thanks for your advice and recommendations.

#99 re: Sawteeth Posted by Andrew on
Thu Nov 02, 18:29 EST 2006

Although I wasn't down last weekend, I think the high peaks got a fair bit of snow. I'd definitely take crampons. I'm guessing not-quite-yet for snowshoes. Don't recall any particular 'cleft' (re the trail description you gave), but there are spots that have short rock steps etc, and they are probably icy now. Again, I'd recommend crampons. Better having them and not using them then not having them and needing them!

#100 re: Sawteeth Posted by ADK Hiker on
Fri Nov 03, 13:11 EST 2006

Andrew, thanks for the advice. I am a novice winter hiker and am in the process of deciding which crampons to buy. I was looking at the Grivel G-10 (as recommended by The Mountaineer). Does this seem like a good set of crampons for a winter hiker in the Adirondacks? Any others you would recommend?

#101 re: Sawteeth Posted by Nanook on
Fri Nov 03, 23:17 EST 2006

We were attempting to climb Gothics on Oct 31st and got stopped by snow at 0.6 miles from the summit. At 4000ft there was about a foot of snow which we didn't expect. It's very wet up there too, so bring everything waterproof! You'll need crampons or snowshoes up there. Good luck!

#102 re: Crampons Posted by Andrew on
Sun Nov 05, 20:31 EST 2006

Hi there.

I'd say any standard-ish issue 10-point general mountaineering crampon is fine. No use buying any fancy mono-point vertical ice crampons or anything like that.

#103 Gothics Posted by Greg on
Mon Nov 06, 17:57 EST 2006

Im planning on hiking up Gothics this weekend. I was wondering what the best route up is this time of year. Thanks

#104 Gothics Posted by Greg on
Mon Nov 06, 18:02 EST 2006

Im planning on hiking up Gothics this weekend. I was wondering what the best route up is this time of year. Thanks

#105 re: Gothics Posted by Andrew on
Tue Nov 07, 16:32 EST 2006

Hi there.

Any of the routes will do, although the south-western approach is steeper and harder.

#106 Posted by Greg on
Tue Nov 07, 19:46 EST 2006

Thanks for the response. I was also wondering if the trails there are well marked or even marked at all. I never been up there before and I want to have a planned route set before I head out. And thanks again for your help.

#107 re: Gothics trails Posted by Andrwe on
Wed Nov 08, 19:57 EST 2006

yes - all of the official trails are marked with NYSDEC trail markers (little round disks on trees).

#108 winter peaks Posted by mark on
Mon Nov 20, 07:52 EST 2006

great site---i've done 28 peaks with my son--all summertime--we wanted to try some in the winter what we have left are sawteeth, santanoni and sewards, cliff and red, allen, haystack basin saddleback, gray ,skylight, marshall, colden------which would be the least difficult to do? and would it be easier to wait until real snow is down instead of november mud?

#109 re: winter peaks Posted by Andrew on
Mon Nov 20, 17:20 EST 2006

Of the peaks you list, I'd say... saddleback, colden and sawteeth are probably the easiest (via their respective shortest routes).

#110 garmin mps file Posted by jimb on
Fri Nov 24, 21:00 EST 2006

I downloaded your AdirondackPeakWaypoints.mps and tried to load into mapsource but an error came up indicating "Mapsource can not read this file. It was created with a different version of mapsource".

What version are you using? I have version 4.09.

I also did not see any way to import the TXT files into mapsource.

I would love to load these into my new etrex vista and head up to the high peaks!

#111 waypoints Posted by Andrew on
Sun Nov 26, 16:36 EST 2006

Hi there.

I posted that waypoint file a _long_ time ago. I can't even remember what version of Mapsource it was. Very annoying that they didn't make the file format for .mps backwards-compatible. I'll have to look into regenerating the file.

In any case, you can load the text file I provide if you download the free version of GPS utility and use that. You may only be able to transfer a subset of waypoints in the free version, but you could cut and manipulate the file into several sub files, each with an amount of waypoints less than the max number the free version allows.

#112 Alice's Cabin Posted by Anna on
Thu Nov 30, 17:53 EST 2006

I am posting this as a response to previous post by Whitey, on Wed Aug 10, 2005. I just came back from a wonderful long Thanksgiving weekend at Alice's Cabin in North Creek, Adirondacks, NY. We couldn't have asked for a better vacation for the occasion! Alice's cabin is an authentic log cabin located just past North Creek in the middle of the Adirondacks. It is a one room open cabin, with a well equipped kitchen, a sleeping loft and a large fireplace. My husband and I would go for hikes during the day and come back to the cabin at night to cook dinners and relax in front of the fire. We had a great time and contrary to previous post [see below], we had no problems what so ever with the cabin or the owner. [I question the accuracy of the information stated in Whitey's post.] Alice's Cabin is a wonderful place to stay at if you're looking for an authentic Adirondack experience! Highly recommended.
----- [below is the original post, by Whitey, from Aug 10, 2005] -----

Whitey Wed Aug 10 11:08:26 EDT 2005
Alice's Cabin
To All Prospective Vacationers,

If anyone is interested in renting a cabin in the Adirondacks, DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT patronize Alice's Cabin of North Creek, NY. Not only myself, but several other persons whom I've met, have had horrible experiences with the absentee landlord. From not receiving their security deposits back, to unsafe conditions in the cabin(no heat in January, homemade ladders to the 2nd story), to dead mice in the cupboards. There are plenty of other options in this most beautiful area of the world. No matter how cheap this place seems, its just not worth it.

#113 re: Alice's Cabin Posted by Andrew on
Thu Nov 30, 19:40 EST 2006

Hi, Anna

Thanks for the positive post about Alice's Cabin. Hopefully more people will be encouraged to give their reviews. I'm glad that this review helps counteract the somewhat sour one from before!

#114 Winter 46 Posted by Dennis B on
Wed Dec 20, 21:17 EST 2006

I'm looking to complete my winter 46 (20 peaks) this season, starting (hopefully) with Dix and maybe Hough on 12/21. Anyone wanting to go along is welcome, at least on the 11 peaks with marked trails...Though I am a 46er I could use some help and possibly some compass training to do the 9 remaining trailess peaks. My email is adkdolphin@hotmail.com. I live in Westport, NY and I'm an early retiree so I can hike most anytime...looking forward to this winter and hearing from any other winter hikers or anyone who might want to share some compass/GPS knowledge...happy trails!! Great website...

#115 winter algonguin Posted by Andy on
Sat Dec 30, 13:50 EST 2006

Are hard shelled boots nescesary, or will hiking boots with crampons work. Does the mountaineer rent crampons? Is an ice axe required for wright?

#116 re: Wright, etc Posted by Andrew on
Mon Jan 01, 11:00 EST 2007

The answer is... it depends!

If the weather and conditions are bad enough (which they can be in the winter), then yes, you'd need cold weather mountaineering boots and crampons for Wright or Algonquin. However, if you have a good idea of the current terrain conditions and the weather (and they aren't all that bad), then you may be able to bareboot it all the way with regular hiking boots even in the dead of winter.

What I like to do is carry snowshoes and crampons in the winter as a matter of course, to use when I encounter conditions appropriate for them.

#117 Yaktrax Posted by ADK Hiker on
Tue Jan 02, 08:39 EST 2007

I saw in your trip report from Wright that you used Yaktrax, from the photos it looks like you have the Pro Yaktrax. I have the Walker Yaktrax and have been concerned about using them for hiking because of all the comments I have read about folks not liking them for hiking, I read a lot of comments about people liking the Stabilicers. So, I'm curious to hear about your experience with Yaktrax, I've been up Wright so I know how steep the final part above treeline is. Did you use only Yaktrax the entire way up? Do you think my Walker version is much different from the Pro version? Do I need to upgrade to either the Pro Yaktrax or Stabilicers? I've encountered a lot icy conditions in the last couple of months that require something more than bare boots, but crampons are too much for. I've been hesitant to rely on the Yaktrax. Thanks so much for your advice!

#118 Yaktrax Posted by ADK Hiker on
Tue Jan 02, 09:23 EST 2007

I saw in your trip report from Wright that you used Yaktrax, from the photos it looks like you have the Pro Yaktrax. I have the Walker Yaktrax and have been concerned about using them for hiking because of all the comments I have read about folks not liking them for hiking, I read a lot of comments about people liking the Stabilicers. So, I'm curious to hear about your experience with Yaktrax, I've been up Wright so I know how steep the final part above treeline is. Did you use only Yaktrax the entire way up? Do you think my Walker version is much different from the Pro version? Do I need to upgrade to either the Pro Yaktrax or Stabilicers? I've encountered a lot icy conditions in the last couple of months that require something more than bare boots, but crampons are too much for. I've been hesitant to rely on the Yaktrax. Thanks so much for your advice!

#119 re: yaktrax Posted by Andrew on
Wed Jan 03, 07:58 EST 2007

Yes, I have the upgraded version of the yaktrax. The differences are that the gauge of the wire and rubber is thicker than the standard walker version, and there is a velcro strap along the top (presumably to help prevent 'slip-offs').

Even with the extra beefiness and the strap, occasionally one or more of the yaktrax's parts will roll up off of the sole. I don't get the sense that this will happen with stabilicers (which I've not used, but have seen). As far as total grip goes, I'm not sure which of the two have more.

On the particular day we climbed wright, the snow and ice conditions above treeline were suitable for yaktrax; the ice surface was uneven enough that the yaktrax wire wraps had something to grab on to. However, on pure, smooth ice, the yaktrax don't grip all that well. The stabilicers might be better in this situation.

I guess I don't really have the definitive answer!

#120 re: yaktrax Posted by Andrew on
Wed Jan 03, 08:00 EST 2007

Oh, one more thing:

As far as overall comfort goes, it is very nice walking with the yaktrax on (may also be the case for the stabilicers, too, for all I know), and they certainly have more grip than a bare-boot on moderately slippery surfaces.

#121 Phelps Posted by Joey K on
Thu Jan 25, 10:04 EST 2007

Me and my two buddies, Josh and Mike Craver are climbing Phelps Mt. January 28, 2007. Any one want to go? joekorowajczyk@gmail.com

#122 Lower Posted by Scott on
Mon Feb 26, 08:44 EST 2007

Andrew,

Ever since my first ADK hike of Whiteface in March of 2004, I have been a frequent user of your site and have found it extremely helpful. I was very interested in your hike of Gothics and Armstrong this past weekend. I am heading into the JBL area this weekend to camp with plans to day pack Big Slide and the Lower Range. Did you happen to notice whether the trail to Big Slide that starts near the Ranger Station in the JBL area is broken out yet? Also, did the other party that you met on the Gothics/Armstrong trek continue on to UWJ? Is so, do you know which way they were headed after that?

Thanks much for any information you can share and continuing to post such great trail reports.

Scott

#123 re: questions Posted by Andrew on
Mon Feb 26, 21:14 EST 2007

Hmmm... I can't remember for sure, but I (and Jenn) seem to recall that the trail up to Big Slide from JBL wasn't broken. But I'm not absolutely positive. I do know that some of the people in the Garden parking lot had Big Slide as their objective; However, I don't know whether they utilized that trail.

The other party of two that we met on Gothics turned around at the summit and went back down the Orebed Brook Trail. They did not continue onwards as we did.

We did hear of another group that broke trail to the top of Upper Wolfjaw and Lower Wolfjaw, so that means that the Range trail is broken for sure from the Saddleback-Gothics Col to the summit of Armstrong (this is the part we did), and then it is unbroken from the summit of Armstrong to the summit of Upper Wolfjaw, and then it is broken again from there to the summit of Lower Wolfjaw.

...Andrew

#124 re:questions Posted by Scott on
Tue Feb 27, 14:06 EST 2007

Andrew,

Thanks much for the timely response.

Scott

#125 camping Posted by Kim on
Wed Apr 04, 03:00 EDT 2007

Years ago a friend took me ( i think) to marcy dam to camp in a lean to for a weekend... Is that still possible? Do you know where i would be able to find the best info on how to do this (ie. registering... fees...etc) I would greatly appreciate it! It was such a wonderful weekend and would like to relive it! :)
Thanks a bunch!

#126 re: lean-to camping Posted by Andrew on
Wed Apr 04, 07:34 EDT 2007

Hi there.

Yes, you can still do this. There isn't any lean-to reservation system that I know of. It is basically first-come, first-serve. A lean-to can accommodate more than one party, usually, so it is possible you may need to share.

I don't know of the exact number, but I think there are three or four lean-tos scattered in the area around Marcy Dam. There's another one less than a mile up the trail towards Avalanche Pass, too.

...Andrew

#127 marcy dam Posted by Kim on
Wed Apr 04, 07:55 EDT 2007

thank you for the info and i have one more question i forgot to ask before... what is the best way to get there? can you get there from the loj?

#128 re: getting to Marcy Dam Posted by Andrew on
Wed Apr 04, 16:45 EDT 2007

Yes, you can get there from the ADK Loj. You can also start at the South Meadows trailhead, which is marginally longer, but there is no charge for parking there.

#129 Re: Newbie... Posted by Samantha on
Mon Apr 09, 21:57 EDT 2007

Andrew,

My sister and I would like to hike a few of the high peaks this summer. Being that both of us are 100% newbies when it comes to hiking the high peaks and hiking in general I am in desperate need of information before we set out. We both want to be as informed as possible. So if you can help a newbie out! I don't have a single question I have tons and I don't know where to start so maybe you can give me the basic rundown or anyone else for that matter!

Thanks,
Sam

#130 re: questions Posted by Andrew on
Thu Apr 12, 16:22 EDT 2007

hmm... that's a bit generic... could you be more specific? For starters and an intro to the Adirondacks, look up Cascade Peak. That's an easy and scenic peak. (You can use the menu to the left to find cascade peak and where it is, etc.)

...Andrew

#131 Looking for a 3-4 day 20-30 mile hike Posted by Kyle on
Wed Apr 25, 12:26 EDT 2007

Want to start by saying this website is awesome....I can tell you folks enjoy what you do and Im thnakful you share your information.

I have a question:

Im looking for a 3-4 day trail hike covering about 30 miles, with moderate terain, with stream and maybe some lake acess for fishing/water. My girlfriend and I arent newbees but we arent 46ers by any means. Im newer to the area and looking for any suggestions that could help in the planning of our trip in May/early June.

Apreciate any help, thansk a ton for the site and any answers.

Kyle

#132 re: Looking for a 3-4 day 20-30 mile hike Posted by Andrew on
Wed Apr 25, 22:41 EDT 2007

Hmm... well, 30-40 miles and water. Perhaps you're looking for something in the area just western High Peaks Region. Something like the Duck Hole area. I don't know much about the trail through that area because I haven't hiked through there, but I know it is quiet and there should be the moderate terrain and water that you are looking for. Perhaps someone on here who's hiked the trail through Duck Hole can comment?

#133 2-3 Day Trip Posted by J on
Thu May 03, 14:51 EDT 2007

Hi,
A friend and I are planning our first 2-3 day trip in the Adirondacks. We'd like to hit at least 1 high peak and we've been looking at a possible trip to Cascade/Porter. Any suggestions on route to make this a 2, or preferably 3 day trip? Or any other ideas on a trip in the Lake Placid area? We're both experienced in the outdoors but have never done a multi-day trip in the Adirondacks before and would like something fairly managable.
Thanks! This website has given great information for our planning... and the photos are fantastic!

#134 re: Porter-Cascade Posted by Andrew on
Thu May 03, 17:10 EDT 2007

Hi there.

The rules for camping within the High Peaks state that you aren't supposed to camp above 3500 feet, so if you are going to camp along the Porter-Cascade traverse, that might be a consideration. Water also might be a concern, since it is a ridge route, if you are camping somewhere along the ridge (i.e. you might want to bring some extra for cooking your dinner, etc).

#135 High Peaks Posted by Jake Schneider on
Tue Jun 05, 17:29 EDT 2007

I am looking for anybody that's willing to hike the peaks with me. I can be reached by email J8KSchneider101@aol.com or 518 335-8679. I also want to hike Mt. Washington in NH, Mt. Mansfield in VT, and Mt. Katahdin in Maine.
Let's do it, LOL.....

Jake

#136 Climbing the High Peaks Posted by Tim on
Fri Jun 22, 16:48 EDT 2007

First of all, great job on the website! I've found it to be one of the most helpful resources available on the high peaks.

My family and I have climbed many sub-4000 foot peaks in past years and were hoping to climb Algonquin, Giant, and Cascade as day hikes this summer. We are all in fairly good shape, and will also have our dog with us. Just wondering if these three peaks will be doable, since we would really like to attempt them. If not, are there any other peaks that would be better to start off with?
Any info on these 3 mountains(how steep, est time of trip in summer) would be much appreciated! Thanks.

#137 easy peaks Posted by Andrew on
Sat Jun 23, 22:39 EDT 2007

Cascade is definitely an easy, short (and scenic) 4000-footer to climb.
Algonquin is not long, but it is much more elevation gain. It, of course, has excellent views.
Giant is also nice - I'd slot it somewhere in between the above two for difficulty. The 'ridge trail' is the most scenic way up.

For detailed info, just use this page: if you haven't noticed, there are trip reports and images galleries of the various peaks along with elevation profiles, distances, maps, etc.

...Andrew

#138 suggestions wanted! Posted by Melissa on
Wed Jun 27, 23:37 EDT 2007

Hi,

I would like to plan a hiking trip in the high peaks region of the ads for this summer. I'm not familiar with the region....I'd be driving down from Ottawa. I'm hoping to design a 2-3 day trip near in the region around Saranac Lake Lake Placid. I like a good challenge (ie: more difficult trails) and a nice view to compensate for all my hard work once I get to the top. I like the idea of doing loops and leaving my gear in the car or at a basecamp.
Can anyone help me out?
Please write me at: melissa(underscore)lemieux(at)email.com

#139 Giant Posted by Ted on
Thu Jun 28, 18:35 EDT 2007

I am constrained by time. How long will it take to get to the peak of Giant from where one parks the car?

Can one see sunset up there and still make it down by dark?

Thanks to whoever comes back

#140 re: Giant Posted by Andrew on
Thu Jun 28, 21:25 EDT 2007

From where you park the car, Giant via the ridge trail is just over 2.5 miles. Assuming a moderate pace of 1 to 1.5 miles per hour, it'll take you... maybe 2 to 3 hours to get up?

Coming back down will still take probably at least 1.5 hours.


If you want something short and nearby with good summit views, how about Noonmark? That has a shorter ascent and descent, although it is still probably an hours' hike down from the top.

...Andrew

#141 giant Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Mon Jul 02, 22:09 EDT 2007

I tried the giant trail up roaring brook last friday in the rain. i went with a new hiker, she couldn't quite make it up in the rain, but it took us about 3 hours to get up 3 miles. Total trail is 3.5 up roaring brook trail. Up the ridge trail is 3 miles from chapel pond, if you're really booking it, you can do it in about 2 hours. Add another hour, hour and a half and you can do rocky peak too, which is pretty good.

#142 Hough Posted by Jack on
Sun Jul 08, 15:25 EDT 2007

I need this mt to finish the Dixes. Is the Lillian Brook trail to the col between Puff and Hough or to the col between Macomb and South Dix open Now?

Jack

#143 re: hough Posted by Andrew on
Sun Jul 08, 16:10 EDT 2007

Hi there.

Those routes are unofficial / herdpath routes, so it isn't really a question of if they are 'open' or not.

you should ask on adkforum.com or some forum like that -- you might have a better chance of getting a response from someone who has done either of these routes.

...Andrew

#144 base camp Posted by tc on
Fri Jul 13, 09:40 EDT 2007

Great Site. Best I have found for sound advice and experience.

Last year I took my 11 year old daughter and her friend and dad to the Adirondacks. We set up a base camp at Lake Colden (in from upper works) and hiked for 4 days. I am looking for a similar experience this August. We have hiked MacIntyre range, Colden, Sky, Phelps, Marcy.

Where would you advise we carry in to and then set out for multiple day excursions. Tenting (& hammock) sites appropriate. We are capable of 10 mile days travelling lite. I have yet to find something as idealic as Colden with central location and refreshing water after the day's work.

Thanks.

#145 re: base camp Posted by Andrew on
Fri Jul 13, 10:37 EDT 2007

well....

you could try something remote, with nice mountains nearby: panther gorge. Although, there's no lake nearby. It is a wild and quiet spot, and Haystack mountain is very nice. In fact, the whole upper great range is quite nice, but it is more of a linear thing, as opposed to something amenable to a 'base camp'.

There aren't that many places in the Adirondacks with lakeside camping and high peaks right nearby (i.e. like Lake Colden).

...Andrew

#146 GPS tracklog setup Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Mon Aug 27, 23:45 EDT 2007

Hi Andrew,
What settings do you use to record tracklogs in your GPS? I have been trying to setup my Garmin eTrex Vista Cx to record tracklogs during various hikes, but I'm not sure what setting works best: by time, by distance, or just leave it on auto. What do you use for your Adirondack tracklogs?

#147 re: GPS Tracklog Setup Posted by Andrew on
Tue Aug 28, 07:13 EDT 2007

I use 'less often', which seems to drop the right frequency of points (for my liking).

...Andrew

#148 Dix Posted by John on
Fri Sep 07, 12:02 EDT 2007

As everyone has commented...superb website, I came across it searching for information on Dix Mountain. I am planning on heading out in a few days to Dix and the only parking area and trailhead I was able to locate is off 87 exit 30 at the ausable club. I have hiked some of the trails in that area and others and decided to go for a larger hike. Do you have any suggestions on parking and which trailhead to pick up? I also read on another website that it is not recommended as a 1 day hike, I have done the mileage before in a day and from what I gathered from your site you have included Dix as one of the stops along the way, were those 1 day trips you completed? Any info or other websites you could suggest would be much appreciated....Thanks, John

#149 Winter Hikes Posted by Laura on
Fri Sep 21, 12:11 EDT 2007

I am planning to work on more high peaks this December 27-31. Last winter I did Phelps and Algonquin (on separate days) with poles and stabilicers, and was happy with that degree of difficulty. Any suggestions for comparable winter peaks? I've already done Cascade, Porter, Big Slide, Giant, RPR, Sawteeth...Thanks!

#150 Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Fri Sep 21, 15:56 EDT 2007

Hi there...

comparable winter peaks? well, there's too many to mention, but for a start, how about Colden, Wright, Gothics, and Basin?

...Andrew

#151 Easiest 46er Posted by Dale on
Thu Nov 08, 12:43 EST 2007

Hello
What a great site you have here.
I have not climbed a 46er since I was in college,1979-early 80s. I am not as healthy as I was then. So I would like to know what your opinion is, concerning climbing a 46er as a start for an old guy like me.
Thanks,
Dale

#152 re: easy 46er Posted by Andrew on
Thu Nov 08, 17:55 EST 2007

I say you should go for it. Never to 'young' to start.

Cascade is a great intro 4000-footer. Short, not too much gain, excellent summit.

...Andrew

#153 Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Fri Nov 09, 09:02 EST 2007

Thanks Andrew,
You talked me into it ! Funny you mention Cascade,I was talking to my brother about this last night...He said Cascade too. I remember climbing it in 1979,during the winter. It really was beautiful up there. Think I will try it before winter settles in.

Thanks again,
Dale

#154 Adirondack Loj-Marcy Dam Posted by Dale on
Fri Nov 09, 16:22 EST 2007

Hello,
My brother and I have decided to Climb Cascade next week. While we are in the area decided to hike into Marcy dam,have not been in there since 1980?. I was wondering what the parking arrangements were this time of year. Crowded,how much$,etc.
Thanks for any help.
Dale
PS How far/difficulty to the dam from the loj, I was in shape back then,never had a concern.Although it seemed very easy,just wondering.

#155 re: Marcy Dam and ADKHP Center Posted by Andrew on
Fri Nov 09, 17:12 EST 2007

Hi, Dale

It now costs $9 (kind of high, I know) to park at the high peaks info center parking lot (where the trail to marcy dam starts). A good free alternative is the south meadows trail, which starts near the end of the south meadows road (the road that turns off to the left just before you head down the steep down-and-up hill on the way to Adirondak Loj). It is slightly longer (maybe half a mile longer), but the parking is free.

Hope this helps,
...Andrew

#156 Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Fri Nov 09, 17:22 EST 2007

Thanks Andrew! Man you are wealth of info,I really appreciate it.I think we will try the route you mention. Another half mile is fine,parking fee is fine...but free is better,pays for half our gas. Also I figure the Loj will be over-populated.I am so glad I stumbled upon your great site.I will try to not bug you too much.
Dale

#157 Which high peak? Posted by Barb on
Tue Nov 20, 01:04 EST 2007

Yes, I also agree with everyone that this is the most informative, helpful sight I've come across for the ADKS. My husband and I have only climbed a few of the high peaks, but are planning on driving up to do one next Monday. We don't yet own snowshoes or crampons. Are we asking for trouble doing Giant this time of year without them? We have already done Cascade. How are the views on Phelps on a partly cloudy day? Thank-you so much!

#158 winter conditions Posted by Andrew on
Tue Nov 20, 07:41 EST 2007

Hi there. Haven't been done to the high peaks over the last few weeks, but I hear that some substantial snow has fallen. I'm guessing snowshoes are a good idea. Try checking for the latest conditions at http://viewsfromthetop.com

#159 Hiking Partner Posted by Chef James on
Tue Nov 20, 12:03 EST 2007

I moved to Long Lake with my girlfriend. I have been hiking a few spots but am interested in getting out more doing winter hikes but, being new to the area I don't know many people and don't know any hikers. So I am putting a call out to others who might be interested in getting together and doing group hikes or even winter camping. Look forward to a response and getting out and enjoying the area more. James

#160 Hiking Partner Posted by Chef James on
Tue Nov 20, 15:27 EST 2007

Forgot to mention that you can email me at jamesl35@frontiernet.net

#161 the Loj... Posted by mikePA on
Thu Nov 22, 09:16 EST 2007

I'm driving up tonight to hit Phelps, Colden and maybe Iroquois....anyone know if snowshoes are needed? Thanks...hit me up @ henninger@rcn.com

#162 Lillian Brook Posted by davebuys on
Tue Jan 22, 12:58 EST 2008

I'll repost an old question and maybe get a new answer. Anybody know which approach to Lillian Brook from the top is better? Between MacComb and S.Dix, or between Pough and Hough? Somebody mentioned on VFTT recently that the top section had been flagged/cut and was in good shape for descending, but did not mention which way. I plan to snowshoe down one or the other and meet up with the main stem. Thanks.

#163 re: lillian brook Posted by andrew on
Tue Jan 22, 19:07 EST 2008

I myself don't know - haven't ever gone down that way. I remember seeing some discussion about it in the adkforum.com forums, and also something about how the authorities don't want that route used.... not sure why (or even if that's the case).

...Andrew

#164 Cabins Posted by Mark on
Sat Jan 26, 13:58 EST 2008

I've been backpacking all my life (50 now) and only last year experienced the hi peak region for the first time in late fall with rain, snow and wind at Dix and Noonmark. Was a rush and I caught the bug! My buddy and I backpack full gear most years but cabin and day hike some years for a break (and the years are catching up to me). Anyone know a decent cabin they can recommend in the region? Nothing fancy, just ability to have an outside fire, by a stream is always nice. Sleep 2 or 3. We would love to spend 4 or 5 days day hiking a bunch of peaks with a light day pack for change in routine.

#165 Posted by Yvon on
Sun Jan 27, 06:21 EST 2008

Re: Lillian Brook
If I can anwer that question to davebuys about Lilian Brook, Andrew. I took this route last summer. It easier to take the path between Macomb & S.Dix to go up and down by the other trail between Hough and Pough who is much steeper.
I have all informations on that hike my Website butt, it is in french only.

#166 re: Cabins Posted by Andrew on
Sun Jan 27, 12:24 EST 2008

In the high peaks region itself, there are only a very select few 'backcountry' cabins - namely the ones in Johns Brook Valley (I think they are called Grace Camp and Camp Peggy O'Brien). They need to be booked well in advance. They aren't right next to a stream, and I don't know if campfires are allowed there. (they may be - I don't know).

#167 Macomb Posted by Dan on
Sat Feb 09, 22:12 EST 2008

Hello.
What a great web site. An amazing amount of information...and well organized.

I have a question. My climbing partner and I are planning to climb Macomb, South and East Dix in a few weeks. We want to overnight camp at the Slide Brook lean-to. Since the road is only open to Clear Pond in the winter, how far is the hike from there to the lean-to? Also, is the shelter in good shape?

Thanks so much for this great resource.

Dan

#168 re: Macomb Posted by Andrew on
Sun Feb 10, 00:13 EST 2008

Hi, and glad you like the website.

As I recall, it is an extra 2 miles of hiking in in the winter (i.e. from the end of where you can drive in the winter to the summer trailhead).

As I recall, the lean-to was in good shape the last time I was there (which was last March - March 2007).

...Andrew

#169 Cabins in the ADK's Posted by John on
Mon Feb 25, 11:11 EST 2008

Hi Andrew,
This is my first post, This is also partly in response to Mark's post of Jan 26, 2008. While there are not many cabins to choose from up there, there are some excellent drive in campsites in the region. Most notably are two turnoffs on Rt 73 right where the "entering the town of Keene" sign is 1/4 mile north of "dysfuntion junction" Pull to the side of the road right where that sign is and there are 3 spots hidden in the woods on the east side of 73 on the banks of the Bouquet and one site on the opposite side that you can drive right in to. There are also similar spots in the South Meadow near Adirondack Loj. The latest topos of the high peaks show these locations as triangles. This is priveledged information and not too many people are aware, but I think your readers represent a more responsible (if you will) breed of hikers, so I am willing to share with you. BTW - Go Jenn get those winter 46!

John

#170 Starting up again Posted by Pete on
Sun Mar 23, 20:05 EDT 2008

Andrew,
My name is Pete. I started hiking the high Peaks when I was about 7 years old. My father and I completed about 1/2 of the 46. I am looking to get back up there and try to finish a goal that has had a very long pause. The other day I was in an office building that a poster of the high peaks labeled and giving the specs on a good number of them. (If I were on any other web site I would probably feel weird saying this) I got this awesome feeling like something pulling me towards those mountains. All at once I had a variety of childhood memories of different experiences that I had encountered and views that I had seen. Up to and including the 3 hour road trips that we would endure just to start our weekend adventures. There was over-nights spent in remote lean-to?s, short and long hikes with various terrain, stories of the history of certain mountains, numerous hikers that shared a friendly smile and wave or a caring word of caution to terrain lying ahead, young and old, men, women, kids and even dogs. When leaving the house or trail head early on those exciting mornings one never knew what lied ahead that day. That feeling of anticipation of the view that awaited your ascent and sense of accomplishment when you finally breathed it all in at the top. My job was always to find the marker at the top that told the tail of what we had just accomplished. Generally we would take a picture of all of our mud covered boots with the toes pointing to the reward of that great day. The funny thing is that when I was a child, although I enjoyed these trips, I never really knew exactly how good all these things were! This was just what we did on the weekend. I guess it took 20 something years of hectic and stressful life to realize what my father had in 1985. Now I own a business and have kids of my own and that one simple poster sparked a fire of interest to get back up there and find that tranquility that is much needed and long over due. I am sorry for such a long entry especially it being my first, but I just wanted to express my excitement to some people who would truly ?get it? I hope to utilize this site for the climbs I am planning in the near future. Great site and thanks for listening/reading.

#171 re: Starting up Again Posted by Andrew on
Sun Mar 23, 22:17 EDT 2008

Hi, Pete

I think you've captured the essence of it all perfectly. Nice to hear you've got the urge to go at it again -- and hope you find the site useful!

...Andrew

#172 Hiking company Posted by [anonymous poster] on
Thu Apr 03, 17:25 EDT 2008

Andrew
Ever hear of anyone looking for someone to climb with? I am having a hard time getting my friends coordinated, with family and long distances the excuses just keep coming and coming. I am not in great shape but plan to be by early summer. My plan is to finish second half of 46 that i need to do to be complete. I have done most of the hikes that one does in a day. Now on to overnights. If you hear of anyone or if anyone reads this please let me know. i can hike most weekends just need to have a plan in place with a little notice. Thanks Pete

#173 May in Adirondacks Posted by Brenda on
Mon Apr 14, 12:20 EDT 2008

Hi Andrew -

Noticed you have very few trip / trips reports for Adirondack High Peak area in May timeframe...is there a reason for this (besides just scheduling). I.e. the weather is to volatile and/or the trails are too muddy, etc.?

Appreciate any advice,

Brenda.

#174 re: May Posted by Andrew on
Mon Apr 14, 19:15 EDT 2008

Hi there.

I usually hike in the White Mountains in NH in the may-ish time frame - that's why you don't see many ADK reports from then.

It _is_ the most messy time to hike (May), but the trails aren't specifically closed.

...Andrew

#175 First Hike Posted by Lou on
Mon Apr 21, 22:12 EDT 2008

Hi Andrew,

Your site is really helpful and the pictures are awesome! I'm attempting this weekend (4/26) my first hike with a college friend. We are both rookies actually but hoping to one day complete the entire journey of the 46. I was curious about how much snow if any and how bad the mud will be this weekend. Do you think this will be a good weekend for our first hike? Do you have any major concerns?

Thanks again,
Lou

#176 Searching for Adelia Posted by Doris on
Wed Apr 23, 16:22 EDT 2008

Hi,
I just googled the web for Adelia Chetreanu and found this site.
Maybe one of you can help me to find Adelia. I lost her address and her phone number in 2000.
It would be rather nice, if anyone could help me to get in contact with Adelia. Her last address I knew was in Belleville.
Please send me an email to DL99@gmx.de

Thank you very much and sorry for using this board for this message.
Doris

#177 snow levels? Posted by Motorman on
Wed Apr 30, 17:17 EDT 2008

Anyone been in to Skylight/Marcy, from the southern approach, via Colden and Flowed Lands? Looking for snow levels. I am planning a hike in about 3-4 weeks with a small group....

Motorman

#178 Troop 44 Plans to hike the Adirondacks Posted by Jim on
Fri May 09, 10:49 EDT 2008

Hi,

Ever since we looked at your Crazy 8 report our Troop has been more than exited about spending a few days hiking the High Peaks. Happy to say, we will be heading up there this year in July.
Our trip plan, which we would start on a Saturday afternoon from Heart Lake and which we plan on finishing on the following Tuesday back at Heart Lake, so far looks like this:

-Leave Heart Lake Saturday afternoon and camp at the campsite below
Phelps after summiting Phelps.
-Sunday early morning, head up to Table Top continuing onto Mt.
Marcy and Haystack and stay overnight at the campsite between
Little Haystack and Basin (Ewart called this the best hidden
backcountry campsite in the Adirondacks).
-Monday: Basin, Saddleback, Gothics, Armstrong, Lower and Upper
Wolfjaw before taking a trail down to John's Brook Valley. We plan
on setting up our 3rd night camp up in that area.
-Tuesday morning: Big Slide Mt. via Slide Mt. Brook Trail continuing
on to Yard Mountain to pick up Trail 12 back to our starting point
where we will stay and relax for the night before heading to
the Westerly Rhode Island beaches for a relaxing beach fishing and
swimming end of trip experience before heading back home to Edison,
New Jersey on Saturday morning.

Our Crew will consist of 6 youths and 4 adults, all of which have been on extended backpacking trips before (Presidential Range, AT in NJ and MD to mention a few). We are aware of the regulations etc. however I thought it would be great if you could share some of your expert thoughts with us on our planned trip. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

In advance many thanks for your kind comments,

Jim

#179 troop 44 trip Posted by Ed on
Sun May 11, 07:35 EDT 2008

I have first hand experience getting escorted out of the high peaks for overnight group size more than 8 in the eastern high peaks. In the summer of 04 we went out of a boyscout camp with 2 guides from the camp and were escorted out for camping to close together and both guides were given tickets, any more than 8 I guarantee the asst. rangers will find you.

I'm a 46er that would never recommend hiking with full packs up mountains with boy scouts unless absolutely necessary. your trip sounds very aggressive. I have found that aggressive hike burnout kids and they never what to go hiking again. You may what to rethink of using a base camp even if it means hiking a few extra miles.

Ed
ADK 07 46er
eveggie@frontiernetnet

#180 Peaks from Johns Brook Lodge Posted by Suzie on
Sat Jul 12, 21:07 EDT 2008

Help Please!

We are staying at Johns Brook Lodge and thinking of doing Gothics, Armstrong, Upper Wolfjaw and Lower Wolfjaw all in one day. How long do you think it will take? Which peak would you do first? Any other suggestions are welcome!

#181 Hiking With Our Dog Posted by Josh on
Fri Aug 01, 11:28 EDT 2008

My wife, some friends and I are planning a trip in the next week to the High Peaks Region with our dog Kaia, an 80 lbs pitbull/boxer/american bulldog mix and was wondering if anyone had any insight or list of dog friendly peaks or peaks that they would believe to be climbable for our dog?

#182 Hiking With Our Dog Posted by Josh on
Fri Aug 01, 11:29 EDT 2008

To clarify above message I am asking for anything anyone may know in addition to the peaks already mentioned in this thread above.

#183 Dog Friendly Peaks Posted by Seth C. Burgess on
Sun Aug 03, 22:37 EDT 2008

My dog is a 9 month old Golden Retriever, approx. 75 lbs.

He has recently gotten his 1st 4 high peaks under his belt.

1. Porter
2. Cascade
3. Esther
4. Whiteface

All were very manageable for him. Someone in you party should be able to lift your 80 lb. dog up and over a large boulder if necessary, though. Also, make sure that you have PLENTY of water for your dog, and know whether or not you can refill by filtering at a stream (all 4 my dog has done were "dry" peaks).

Your dog should definitely be leashed on Cascade & Porter, and just to safeguard yourself from any hostile hikers, carry your rabies certification w/ you!

Feel free to shoot me an email if you have any specific questions on high-peaking w/ a dog! (seth.c.burgess@gmail.com)

#184 Dogs doing the Dacks Posted by Jeff on
Thu Aug 28, 11:10 EDT 2008

Hello all dogs and hikers !

I started at the Garden and then hiked Big Slide ,Phelps , Table Top , Marcy , Gray , Skylight , Marcy and then out to the Garden(parking area ).

Rascal , my 3/4 pug and 1/4 beagle , and I had a great time on Big Slide and the sun rise is great as the sun rises over the Great Range to the East and more peaks are ahead to the West .

Marcy is also a great hike and we approached Marcy form two sides .
While at Marcy , Skylight is a great if narrow hike .
(Haystack is near and looks fun .)

Phelps is very diffficult and has two or more foot ledges to climb ...the last mile of Phelps is tough and has a good view .

Table top is great if one likes hiking in a two foot deep creek bed by two feet wide with roots all around ( go 46'rs ) .
Gray is also tough and narrow .

We cannot wait to come back !

jeff.meetup@gmail.com
Jeff

#185 September 2008 Hike Posted by Jeff on
Thu Aug 28, 11:30 EDT 2008

Hello Adirondack Hikers ,

Adirondack hiking the second or third weekend in September of 2008 is on the agenda for Rascal , my puggle , and me .

We want to do the Santanonis and the Sewards .

We will then do the pair Nye and Street and then the pair Cascasde and Porter and then Giant and Rocky as we see fit .

We want to start on Friday and go through Sunday .

Come join us !

jeff.meetup@gmail.com
Jeff

#186 Thank you Andrew Posted by Jeff on
Thu Aug 28, 11:39 EDT 2008

Andrew ,

I thank you for the valuable information on the Adirondacks .

This web site is a great resourse .

jeff.meetup@gmail.com
Jeff

#187 GPS tracklog converter Posted by outdooryves on
Mon Oct 27, 17:06 EDT 2008

Hi everyone,

While reading a few logs, I notice that some people are concern about converting Andrew's tracklog for their own GPSr.

Here is a link that does everything....

http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/gpsbabel/

Another interesting place, that most of hiker-geocacher use, is the classical:

Gcalc (now named Fizzycalc)

http://www.fizzymagic.net/Geocaching/FizzyCalc/

Most of Andrew's traklog can also be convert in KMZ file for Google Earth, you will see trails in 3D!

Happy hiking ;-)

outdooryves

P.S. Thank's Andrew for posting your GPS coordinates and tracklogs on your site (very usefull)


#188 Conditions.... Posted by Rob on
Tue Nov 25, 17:12 EST 2008

Love the site and thanks for it. Great information, pictures and accurate climbing logs. I am looking to climb a peak this Friday instead of fighting the crowds at the stores. However, I am concerned about the conditions currently and equipment needed. I am assuming there is snow at the base of the mountains and much more along with ice at the summit. At this time of year, would it be possible to climb without any winter climbing gear such as crampons etc....

Instead of wasting a 3.5 hour drive to the peaks to find out it is too dangerous without the right gear. I am inquiring with you, if it is possible to climb with no winter equipment at this point. And if so, how dangerous it would be.

Thanks in advance for your assistance.

Rob.

#189 Re: Conditions... Posted by Andrew on
Wed Nov 26, 00:38 EST 2008

Hi, Rob

Well, I do know there is snow in the Adirondacks. It's not that deep yet, but it is pretty much continuous. There is definitely ice in sections higher up in certain areas. Certainly for some peaks, crampons or some sort of ice-grip aid are going to be required. And soon, the snow may be deep enough to require snowshoes.

On the other hand, some peaks probably can be done without crampons or snowshoes right now. The key problem is that in these transition periods, you can never really be certain if you will or won't need them. That's why the best option is to just take the stuff along just in case. Not saying you have to do this, it's just my recommendation (oh, and all of the usual full-on proper winter clothing, too).

...Andrew

P.S. Check out the site viewsfromthetop.com. They have a decent current trail conditions section that people post to. Good for getting an idea of current conditions.

#190 Winter Camping Posted by Mike on
Sat Jan 10, 12:03 EST 2009

Andrew,

What peak would you recommend for a first winter hike and overnight camp. We hiked some peaks this summer; Whiteface, Marcy, Ester but we want to try a winter peak and spend the night out. I have the gear and spent some time camping in Canada (Yellowknife) and north of treeline in the winter. I'm taking my daughter and want to make it reasonable. thoughts....

Thanks
Mike

#191 re: Winter Camping Posted by Andrew on
Sat Jan 10, 15:11 EST 2009

Hi, Mike

Well, there are a lot of nice lean-tos and backcountry camp spots in the Marcy Dam area and in the Lake Colden area. Those would both be good places to start. As you may already know, the lean-tos are first-come-first-serve.

Plus (especially from the Lake Colden area), there are a number of peaks close by to climb (e.g. Mount Colden).

Hope this helps,

...Andrew

#192 Winter Camping Posted by Mike on
Fri Jan 16, 22:28 EST 2009

Andrew,

Thanks! We'll start at Lake Colden.

Mike

#193 Santanoni-s Posted by Don on
Sat Jan 17, 10:45 EST 2009

HI,
We are considering doing the Santanoni - 3 on Jan. 31sti in one day. Any others interested? Anyone hike them recently, or planning to prior to the 31st?

This web site is Awesome - the winter Santanoni trip report is not only informative - but useful and beautiful THANK YOU!!

Thanks

Don

#194 Mount Washington Posted by Joe on
Mon Feb 02, 00:26 EST 2009

Andrew,

I have used your website as a valuable planning tool in many of my Adirondack hiking trips and truly appreciate the resources you provide. This March, Myself and a buddy of mine are planning a trip up Mount Washington in NH, I know you are familiar with the White Mountains and I was wondering if there was any particular route you would suggest for this hike or if you had done it before and had any words of wisdom to pass along. We started our planning back in December and I would appreciate any advice you could offer.


Thanks,

Joe

#195 re: Mount Washington Posted by Andrew on
Mon Feb 02, 18:40 EST 2009

Hi, Joe

Thanks for the compliments re: my adk pages.

Yes, I've done Washington a number of times. As you probably already know, there are many ways up. The Lion's head route is probably a good way to go, with good access from Pinkham notch.

If you are into a steep and challenging mountaineering type approach in winter, you could do something like Huntington Ravine. But, you need to be sure about avalanche conditions and comfortable on steep snow and/or ice.

And, there's always something a bit longer like going up and around via boot spur. Or perhaps some of the longer routes from the west side.

#196 Mount Washington Posted by Joe on
Tue Feb 03, 20:59 EST 2009

Thanks for the very quick response, the advice was helpful.

#197 Seward Range Posted by gina on
Wed Feb 18, 10:33 EST 2009

Hi Andrew,

For a long time I read your adk pages. Thank you for all the informations.

This friday, I will do the Seward and I would like to know if the crampons are very necessary on these mountains not to "abrubts".

Gina

#198 re: Seward Range (in reply-to message #197) Posted by Andrew on
Wed Feb 18, 12:21 EST 2009

Hi, Gina

The current conditions (as of this week, I mean) are such that it doesn't appear that you'll need crampons.   Good snowshoes with lots of teeth on them are probably the best bet.

Hope this helps,
...Andrew

gina wrote:

Hi Andrew,

For a long time I read your adk pages. Thank you for all the informations.

This friday, I will do the Seward and I would like to know if the crampons are very necessary on these mountains not to "abrubts".

Gina

 

 

#199 end of winter hiking? Posted by Peter on
Fri Feb 27, 12:47 EST 2009

Hi Andrew,

Your website is great.  My friends and I went on a week long hike in the high peaks last August, and we are looking forward to returning.  We are all novice hikers and don't have snowshoes.  In your experience, when is it safe to hike up there without snowshoes or crampons?  Late April?  May?  Thanks,

Peter

#200 re: end of winter hiking? (in reply-to message #199) Posted by Andrew on
Fri Feb 27, 17:55 EST 2009

Hi, Peter

The answer to your question is 'it depends'.  Generally,  I'd say that you don't need snowshoes after the end of April, and probably don't need crampons by mid-May.   Of course, if things melt extremely rapidly this year, then you can shift those dates a few weeks earlier.

...Andrew

Peter wrote:

Hi Andrew,

Your website is great.  My friends and I went on a week long hike in the high peaks last August, and we are looking forward to returning.  We are all novice hikers and don't have snowshoes.  In your experience, when is it safe to hike up there without snowshoes or crampons?  Late April?  May?  Thanks,

Peter

#201 Gothics on March 21st Posted by Roger Fontana on
Sun Mar 01, 16:43 EST 2009

Hello Andrew.  I coming up to the high peaks with one other adult and 6 Scouts, ages 14-17, all experienced packpackers.  We did Avalanche Camp/Phelps Mtn two years ago March, and was looking for something different this go around, perhaps Gothics.  We have good snow shoes with cleats, but no crapons.  Would that make for an OK trip.  I know lots depends on anticipated weather conditions, but any general advice would be welcomed.  My map shows a lean to on a trail bearing south from the JB Lodge.  We may have a second group coming in staying at a lean to on an adjacent trail and perhaps do Upper Wolf Jaw and Armstrong, then meet up with us on Gothics.  Any advice would be more than welcomed.  (We have a bad habit of biting off more than we can chew on occaision).

Roger Fontana

 

#202 re: Gothics on March 21st (in reply-to message #201) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Mar 01, 18:26 EST 2009

Hi, Roger

You are correct when you say that it all depends on the weather conditions (with regards to whether or not you need crampons).  Late in the winter and early in the spring are likely to have the highest amounts of ice, since there is a lot of melt-freeze going on at this time of year.   Another consideration, this time specifically with regards to Gothics, is that the ridge-climb from the southwest (that is, from the Saddleback-Gothics col) is steep and somewhat airy.  As a result, if there's any ice on that part, you will definitely want crampons.    In order to migitate this problem, you could attempt perhaps to summit from the Armstrong side or the Sawteeth/Pyramid side.

So, there you have it.  Ideally you'd have crampons (unless you have it on good authority that conditions don't require it on the day that you go), but if you don't, consider the conditions and the route.

...Andrew

Roger Fontana wrote:

Hello Andrew.  I coming up to the high peaks with one other adult and 6 Scouts, ages 14-17, all experienced packpackers.  We did Avalanche Camp/Phelps Mtn two years ago March, and was looking for something different this go around, perhaps Gothics.  We have good snow shoes with cleats, but no crapons.  Would that make for an OK trip.  I know lots depends on anticipated weather conditions, but any general advice would be welcomed.  My map shows a lean to on a trail bearing south from the JB Lodge.  We may have a second group coming in staying at a lean to on an adjacent trail and perhaps do Upper Wolf Jaw and Armstrong, then meet up with us on Gothics.  Any advice would be more than welcomed.  (We have a bad habit of biting off more than we can chew on occaision).

Roger Fontana

#203 Gothics Posted by Roger Fontana on
Mon Mar 02, 06:49 EST 2009

Thanks for the info.

I'll let you know how we made out.

Roger

#204 Cliff Mt Posted by John on
Tue May 05, 11:50 EDT 2009

Hi Andrew,

I've read both of your accounts of climbing Cliff in the winter from Flowed Lands.  I am asking for your impression as to whether this would be a practical approach during the non-winter time of the year.  I realize that we would not be able to traverse over the water, but I figured since you've seen the lay of the land up close that you might have an opinion as to whether it could be done by skirting the shoreline until we got to your starting location.  And also, do you think the route up the mountain from there is a reasonable way to go in the summer?   I know how snow can make an arduous surface much friendlier.  I know I am asking for an opinion here, but was hoping to shave some miles off of the Opalescent River -> Uphill Brook route without killing ourselves in the process.   What do you think?

John Ripley

 

#205 re: Cliff Mt (in reply-to message #204) Posted by Andrew on
Tue May 05, 17:57 EDT 2009

 

John wrote:

Hi Andrew,

I've read both of your accounts of climbing Cliff in the winter from Flowed Lands.  I am asking for your impression as to whether this would be a practical approach during the non-winter time of the year.  I realize that we would not be able to traverse over the water, but I figured since you've seen the lay of the land up close that you might have an opinion as to whether it could be done by skirting the shoreline until we got to your starting location.  And also, do you think the route up the mountain from there is a reasonable way to go in the summer?   I know how snow can make an arduous surface much friendlier.  I know I am asking for an opinion here, but was hoping to shave some miles off of the Opalescent River -> Uphill Brook route without killing ourselves in the process.   What do you think?

John Ripley

 

 Hi, John

It's hard to say exactly what the shoreline of Flowed lands is like in the summer, but, assuming it isn't too swampy, it might be ok.   As far as the bushwhack up goes, I think it could be 'blow-down-y' without snow.  There seems to be a lot of areas where there's a large open area, but you can kind of tell that there are downed logs and such underneath the snow.  Would that translate into a maze of downed logs to cross in the summer....?  perhaps.    Perhaps asking on adkforum.com or some place like that would get you an answer from someone who has actually done the route in the summer. 

 

 

#206 re: Cliff Mt (in reply-to message #205) Posted by John on
Wed May 06, 13:19 EDT 2009

 

 

Thanks Andrew...I think we'll pass on this idea, in fact to quote my hiking buddy:

I guess we'll stick to the trail guide this time around.

"So, there is a possibility of swampy - muddy hiking during the first and last 3rd of the hike with bushwhacking through blow-down in the middle….when can we go? I say lets wait until the black flies are really really thick."    

#207 Suggestion for family climb Posted by Tom on
Fri Jul 17, 00:10 EDT 2009

Wow, great website!

Our family is vacationing in a couple weeks staying in Lake Placid.  Looking for a suggestion for a family climb.  Kids are 11, 15 and 17.  Mom and Dad late 40's.  We're a fairly fit family but have not done many climbs.  Climbed Blue Mountain a few years ago without difficulty.  Looking for a higher peak than that and one with easy access from Lake Placid and one that won't consume an entire day.  Any suggestions appreciated. 

#208 re: Suggestion for family climb (in reply-to message #207) Posted by Chris on
Fri Jul 17, 13:04 EDT 2009

 

Tom wrote:

Wow, great website!

Our family is vacationing in a couple weeks staying in Lake Placid.  Looking for a suggestion for a family climb.  Kids are 11, 15 and 17.  Mom and Dad late 40's.  We're a fairly fit family but have not done many climbs.  Climbed Blue Mountain a few years ago without difficulty.  Looking for a higher peak than that and one with easy access from Lake Placid and one that won't consume an entire day.  Any suggestions appreciated. 

 

Tom,

If you haven't done it yet, try Cascade Mtn. It has nice views, is relatively short, and is not a far drive from Lake Placid.

 

 

#209 re: Suggestion for family climb (in reply-to message #207) Posted by David on
Fri Jul 17, 20:27 EDT 2009

 

Tom wrote:

Wow, great website!

Our family is vacationing in a couple weeks staying in Lake Placid.  Looking for a suggestion for a family climb.  Kids are 11, 15 and 17.  Mom and Dad late 40's.  We're a fairly fit family but have not done many climbs.  Climbed Blue Mountain a few years ago without difficulty.  Looking for a higher peak than that and one with easy access from Lake Placid and one that won't consume an entire day.  Any suggestions appreciated. 

 

Roostercomb is also a very nice climb, and it's fairly close to LP. Relatively easy and provides a nice view of Giant Mountain.

#210 re: Suggestion for family climb (in reply-to message #209) Posted by Andrew on
Fri Jul 17, 23:33 EDT 2009

To add a few more [nice, short, good views]:

Pitchoff Ridge

The Brothers (on the way to Big Slide)

Noonmark Mountain

Ampersand Mountain

Round Mountain

David wrote:

 

Tom wrote:

Wow, great website!

Our family is vacationing in a couple weeks staying in Lake Placid.  Looking for a suggestion for a family climb.  Kids are 11, 15 and 17.  Mom and Dad late 40's.  We're a fairly fit family but have not done many climbs.  Climbed Blue Mountain a few years ago without difficulty.  Looking for a higher peak than that and one with easy access from Lake Placid and one that won't consume an entire day.  Any suggestions appreciated. 

 

Roostercomb is also a very nice climb, and it's fairly close to LP. Relatively easy and provides a nice view of Giant Mountain.

 

 

#211 re: Suggestion for family climb (in reply-to message #210) Posted by tom on
Sat Jul 18, 02:22 EDT 2009

Thanks for the recommendations

#212 Ward Brook Region Posted by John on
Tue Jul 28, 16:02 EDT 2009

Hi Andrew,

I'm planning an overnight trip into the Seward Range area with the hope of using my new tent for 2 nights.  Am planning to try to find a campsite sort of in between where the route up Seymour starts and the approach to Seward-Donaldson-Emmons.  My  plan is to hike the 4 plus miles in - get set up and climb Seymour on day 1 and the other three on day 2.  In your opinion are there good spots for pitching a tent in there and how is the water availability?   I know there is a lean-to at Ward Brook, but am hoping to tent camp.  Also...are campfires allowed?

 

#213 Hike from Marcy Dam to Mt Haystack Posted by Sean on
Fri Jul 31, 14:01 EDT 2009

Hello there! I just had a general question regaurding a upcoming hike me and 2 of my friends are going to be doing at the end of august.  I was just wondering the best trail to take out of Marcy Dam to get to Mt Haystack.  I want it to be somewhat challenging and not just a nature hike if you know what i mean.  Also how hard is Haystack to climb? ive heard conflicting stories and just wondering what you take on it would be.  And if you could recommend anyother good climbs.  We have done Marcy and Algonquin and we are still kinda new to the high peaks.  Any advice would be very helpful!! 

Thanks, Sean

p.s. if you can email me with your thoughts please do so at sfarrell005@gmail.com

#214 re: Ward Brook Region (in reply-to message #212) Posted by Andrew on
Sat Aug 01, 13:49 EDT 2009

I can't recall specifically any campspots, but the terrain is fairly flat, so there must be something you could find.  And, you could also stay somewhere in the vicinity of the Ward Brook lean-to -- that would be a good location along your route.

There are several streams that are crossed along the way, so water will not likely be an issue - especially this year.

Not sure about the rules on campfires.  It might be dependant on the current fire danger level.

John wrote:

Hi Andrew,

I'm planning an overnight trip into the Seward Range area with the hope of using my new tent for 2 nights.  Am planning to try to find a campsite sort of in between where the route up Seymour starts and the approach to Seward-Donaldson-Emmons.  My  plan is to hike the 4 plus miles in - get set up and climb Seymour on day 1 and the other three on day 2.  In your opinion are there good spots for pitching a tent in there and how is the water availability?   I know there is a lean-to at Ward Brook, but am hoping to tent camp.  Also...are campfires allowed?

 

 

 

#215 re: Hike from Marcy Dam to Mt Haystack (in reply-to message #213) Posted by Jake on
Mon Aug 03, 12:00 EDT 2009

While not Andrew, I can answer your question- the best trail to take from marcy Dam to the Haystack is none. Go from the Garden. Head over Big Slide via the Brothers, camp down in John's Brook Valley and then climb haystack via the Great Range over Basin/Saddleback or via the Phelps trail.

P.S. - Andrew - I've read your site for a few years now and have to say that it is the best source for information regarding the high peaks anywhere on the web. The combination of pictures and climbing reports can't be beat.

 

 

#216 re: Hike from Marcy Dam to Mt Haystack (in reply-to message #215) Posted by Andrew on
Mon Aug 03, 13:21 EDT 2009

many thanks for the kind words!

...Andrew

Jake wrote:

While not Andrew, I can answer your question- the best trail to take from marcy Dam to the Haystack is none. Go from the Garden. Head over Big Slide via the Brothers, camp down in John's Brook Valley and then climb haystack via the Great Range over Basin/Saddleback or via the Phelps trail.

P.S. - Andrew - I've read your site for a few years now and have to say that it is the best source for information regarding the high peaks anywhere on the web. The combination of pictures and climbing reports can't be beat.

 

 

 

 

#217 Giant from route 9N Posted by Jake on
Tue Aug 11, 10:52 EDT 2009

Andrew,

Have you ever climbed Giant from Route 9N. This route goes over owls head lookout and "high bank" a glacial rock slope.  It appears to be seldom used but well maintained and conditioned. 

#218 re: Giant from route 9N (in reply-to message #217) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Aug 11, 21:10 EDT 2009

Actually, I haven't.  One of these days I'll have to give it a go.

Jake wrote:

Andrew,

Have you ever climbed Giant from Route 9N. This route goes over owls head lookout and "high bank" a glacial rock slope.  It appears to be seldom used but well maintained and conditioned. 

 

 

#219 re: Giant from route 9N (in reply-to message #218) Posted by Jake on
Thu Aug 13, 10:30 EDT 2009

Well then, I'll let you know how it goes. I decided to do it in early september.

 

#220 trap dike question Posted by Peter on
Sat Sep 12, 14:36 EDT 2009

Hi Andrew,

My friends and I were spending a week in the High Peaks and decided to climb Colden.  Having done so before and wanting to try something different, and all of us enthusiastic about climbing, we decided to do the trap dike.  It was fantastic.  Only problem was I don't think we exited when we were supposed to.  We found a very faint trail at the top of the dike and followed it up a rock slide for a few hundred yards, then it entered the woods and we had to bushwhack our way to the top.  We weren't sure if that was what was supposed to happen, as all we were told when we asked the ranger beforehand about our route was to make sure we exited to the right after 3 steps.  We weren't sure where the steps ended, and after looking at your climbs it looks like we went too far.  I also wasn't sure if bushwhacking up there was detrimental to the vegetation.  As an awesome hike that I plan on doing again sometime soon, do you have any tips for how to know when to exit?  Is there a cairn?  I don't own a GPS and don't plan on buying one anytime soon as I am a poor medical student...Thanks!

Peter

#221 re: trap dike question (in reply-to message #220) Posted by Andrew on
Sat Sep 12, 16:08 EDT 2009

Hi.

I find it difficult to describe this spot, and even though I've been up the Trap Dike five or six times, I still don't have a specific feature that I use to describe the spot.  I do have a GPS waypoint that I use... although in essence what you want to do is climb up high enough that you can easily exit right onto the open slabs, but not so high that exiting right gets you into bushwhacking.  That's pretty much the only good non-gps description I can give.

...Andrew

Peter wrote:

Hi Andrew,

My friends and I were spending a week in the High Peaks and decided to climb Colden.  Having done so before and wanting to try something different, and all of us enthusiastic about climbing, we decided to do the trap dike.  It was fantastic.  Only problem was I don't think we exited when we were supposed to.  We found a very faint trail at the top of the dike and followed it up a rock slide for a few hundred yards, then it entered the woods and we had to bushwhack our way to the top.  We weren't sure if that was what was supposed to happen, as all we were told when we asked the ranger beforehand about our route was to make sure we exited to the right after 3 steps.  We weren't sure where the steps ended, and after looking at your climbs it looks like we went too far.  I also wasn't sure if bushwhacking up there was detrimental to the vegetation.  As an awesome hike that I plan on doing again sometime soon, do you have any tips for how to know when to exit?  Is there a cairn?  I don't own a GPS and don't plan on buying one anytime soon as I am a poor medical student...Thanks!

Peter

 

 

#222 GPS Units Posted by Jim, Saratoga on
Tue Sep 29, 16:27 EDT 2009

Hey Andrew,

Your trip reports have prepared me for many of my W's (36 now), thanks.  Before the winter season begins I am planning to pick up a GPS unit, I am fully aware that there are several sites that I could go to and receive input, advice, and recommendations about GPS units.  But knowing that you have used them extensively out west in the plains and in the Daks with less than ideal conditions, I was hoping to get your thoughts.  My needs are Daks related.  So your thoughts on brand, battery v rechargeable, screen size/color, ease of use would be appreciated.  Thanks.

Jim

#223 re: GPS Units (in reply-to message #222) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Sep 29, 18:45 EDT 2009

Hi, Jim

I have a Garmin GPSMap 60csx.  I think the 60 'x' line (60cx, 60csx) are among the best overall outdoor models in terms of price versus value.  It has all of the important qualities necessary for a good outdoor mapping GPS: a high-sensitivity receiver, waterproofness, good battery life and a decent feature set.
Also good but with a smaller screen and packaging (if smallness is important for you) is the Garmin Etrex Vista HCx (For Garmin, anything with an 'x' on the end denotes the high sensitivity receiver - a very important point).

There are some other higher end Garmin models that I find less attractive (more expensive, lower battery life) and some lower end models that don't have the high sensitivity receiver. 

There are also comparable models by other manufacturers (e.g. Magellan) that offer equal value.  I don't remember the names of the models, but the attributes you want are the same: a high-sensitivity receiver, good battery life, waterproofness.  

Almost all current models that have these attributes are color, so the choice of going with black and white for a cost savings probably won't be presented to you.

I find ease of use to be similar across most models, and don't have a strong opinion in that area.

...Andrew

Jim, Saratoga wrote:

Hey Andrew,

Your trip reports have prepared me for many of my W's (36 now), thanks.  Before the winter season begins I am planning to pick up a GPS unit, I am fully aware that there are several sites that I could go to and receive input, advice, and recommendations about GPS units.  But knowing that you have used them extensively out west in the plains and in the Daks with less than ideal conditions, I was hoping to get your thoughts.  My needs are Daks related.  So your thoughts on brand, battery v rechargeable, screen size/color, ease of use would be appreciated.  Thanks.

Jim

 

 

#224 lower range Posted by Steve on
Wed Sep 30, 08:35 EDT 2009

 

Hi Andrew,
 I just stumbled onto your site.. (great site so far a big help) in a week and ½ we are doing sawteeth,Gothics,Armstrong,U.Wlf.Jaw,L.Wlf.Jaw
We were thinking about going from “the Gate” . take the west river trail to wedge brook trail, (setup camp somewhere near the wedge brook trail,  take our daypacks) then we were thinking of going back to the west river trail, to the Weld trail (to pyramid) then to Gothics, Armstong, U wlfjaw, then Lwlfjaw, Then back to camp on the wedge brook trail. DO you think we will have time to Hit Sawteeth fist? We are planning to get up there at 6:00am and would like to get back to camp with at least 1 hr of daylight. (so about 5:30 6:00pm)
Also what is the best way to do these mountains. (wolfjaws first or last?)
Thank you for your time
Steve

 

#225 re: lower range (in reply-to message #224) Posted by Andrew on
Wed Sep 30, 20:07 EDT 2009

Hi.  It all depends on how fast you hike.   However, the climb up to Sawteeth is a small addition, if you're already doing Pyramid (i.e. climbing Sawteeth from the Pyramid-Sawteeth col).  Maybe an extra hour or so?

Also, not sure if the spot you're proposing to camp on is on AMR land or not.  Not sure what the camping rules are on AMR land (I suspect the answer is 'not allowed').

Regarding order, well... the Wolfjaws are the least scenic, so maybe get them out of the way first (i.e save the dessert for last sort of thing).

Steve wrote:

 

Hi Andrew,
 I just stumbled onto your site.. (great site so far a big help) in a week and ½ we are doing sawteeth,Gothics,Armstrong,U.Wlf.Jaw,L.Wlf.Jaw
We were thinking about going from “the Gate” . take the west river trail to wedge brook trail, (setup camp somewhere near the wedge brook trail,  take our daypacks) then we were thinking of going back to the west river trail, to the Weld trail (to pyramid) then to Gothics, Armstong, U wlfjaw, then Lwlfjaw, Then back to camp on the wedge brook trail. DO you think we will have time to Hit Sawteeth fist? We are planning to get up there at 6:00am and would like to get back to camp with at least 1 hr of daylight. (so about 5:30 6:00pm)
Also what is the best way to do these mountains. (wolfjaws first or last?)
Thank you for your time
Steve

 

 

 

#226 Dix Posted by Peter on
Sat Oct 03, 11:27 EDT 2009

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for all the advice you've given on previous posts.  Do you ever hike in October?  I was thinking of going and doing the Macomb-Dix loop next weekend but I have no idea what to expect as the latest I've ever hiked in the High Peaks is mid August.  I was thinking of packing the same as a January hike in the Smokies, but should I expect ice that would require equipment?

Peter

#227 Garmin 60CSX Posted by Craig on
Sat Oct 03, 20:15 EDT 2009

Hi Andrew,

You have a GREAT site, and I enjoy it tremendously!

I see that you use the "Garmin 60CSX GPS Unit". Do you use the "Garmin US Topo 24K National Parks East" maps? Also, do you use any other kind of software on your PC for this unit?

Thanks,

Craig #6349

#228 re: Dix (in reply-to message #226) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Oct 04, 10:33 EDT 2009

I do hike in the fall, although not as often as I should.    As far as I can tell, winter conditions haven't yet arrived in the high peaks, although it looks like it might be a little wet these days.   Unless things get much colder soon, I'm guessing you can leave the ice traction gear behind.   Keep your eyes open just in case, though - it is possible that early in the morning there might be a few icy spots that you need to avoid.

Peter wrote:

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for all the advice you've given on previous posts.  Do you ever hike in October?  I was thinking of going and doing the Macomb-Dix loop next weekend but I have no idea what to expect as the latest I've ever hiked in the High Peaks is mid August.  I was thinking of packing the same as a January hike in the Smokies, but should I expect ice that would require equipment?

Peter

 

 

#229 re: Garmin 60CSX (in reply-to message #227) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Oct 04, 10:35 EDT 2009

Thank you for the compliments.  There are many upgrades I need to make to it before it becomes really great, though....

I do indeed have a 60csx.  I also do have the US Topo 24K NP maps (both east and west).  However, note that this map set does not cover the Adirondacks, since the Adirondack Park isn't a national park (not sure if that's an issue for you, but in case it is...).   There is a more generic US topo map set that I use for my Adirondack journeys.  It's not as detailed (the scale is only at 1:50,000 I think), but it still is pretty good.

...Andrew

Craig wrote:

Hi Andrew,

You have a GREAT site, and I enjoy it tremendously!

I see that you use the "Garmin 60CSX GPS Unit". Do you use the "Garmin US Topo 24K National Parks East" maps? Also, do you use any other kind of software on your PC for this unit?

Thanks,

Craig #6349

 

 

#230 Gothics Posted by Steve on
Sun Oct 04, 14:26 EDT 2009

Hi Andrew.

  Do you know if the "cables" are still on Gothics. I though that I read some where that they have been removed. Any instie to this would be a great help.

 

Thanks again

Steve

#231 re: Gothics (in reply-to message #230) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Oct 04, 16:21 EDT 2009

Hi, Steve

I had heard that at point point they were not there, but I think they are there now.  But don't quote me on that.

...Andrew

Steve wrote:

Hi Andrew.

  Do you know if the "cables" are still on Gothics. I though that I read some where that they have been removed. Any instie to this would be a great help.

 

Thanks again

Steve

 

 

#232 re: Gothics (in reply-to message #231) Posted by Dave on
Thu Oct 08, 15:45 EDT 2009

The cables were on Gothics when I climbed it back in July.

Dave

#233 New Trail on Lyon Mountain Posted by Brian Sutherland on
Sun Oct 18, 17:01 EDT 2009

Hey Andrew,

Thanks again for your incredibly informative site! We most recently used it to scope a hike of Lyon Mountain this weekend (Oct 17/09). The maps were essential to successfully finding the unmarked road to the trailhead.

You may be intrigued to know that there is a new official trail on Lyon Mountain. It branches off the original trail after a few hundred metres, then winds its way up at an easier grade, before rejoining the original trail for the final ascent. Following this path makes the journey about 1.5 kms longer each way, and less difficult in terms of vertical push. It also provides the opportunity to hike Lyon Mountain using a partial loop route (i.e. descend via the old path).

At the summit the tower is still open and in reasonable condition. There are several, presumably new, trails along the summit ridge to lookout points in each compass direction.

In all, a nice "short hike" within quick driving distance of Ottawa and other southeastern Ontario and southwestern Quebec locations.

All the best,  Brian Sutherland  (Kanata)

#234 re: New Trail on Lyon Mountain (in reply-to message #233) Posted by Andrew` on
Sun Oct 18, 20:02 EDT 2009

Thanks for the beta - I'd heard of the new route, but hadn't done it yet.

#235 US Topo 24K Nat East (in reply-to message #229) Posted by Craig on
Sat Oct 31, 10:59 EDT 2009

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for your recent reply.

I recently purchased the US Topo 24K Nat East ver.3. To my surprise, this CD does contain several major state parks including the Adirondack State Park! Check it out.

Thanks again

Craig #6349

#236 re: US Topo 24K Nat East (in reply-to message #235) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Nov 01, 12:33 EST 2009

Hmm.  Interesting.   I will indeed have to check this out.   1:24K topo maps would be quite nice to have for the mountains in the NE.

Thanks for the tip.

Craig wrote:

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for your recent reply.

I recently purchased the US Topo 24K Nat East ver.3. To my surprise, this CD does contain several major state parks including the Adirondack State Park! Check it out.

Thanks again

Craig #6349

 

 

#238 MacNaughton Mtn Posted by Tim on
Sun Nov 08, 08:48 EST 2009

My friend and I spent our last night of an 8 day backpacking trip at Wallface Ponds - very interesting place - VERY miserable to get to!

Check out my video of the place at youtube if you get a chance:

http://www.youtube.com/user/twochordcool#p/u/8/rIDu92NDcy4

#239 East Dix Posted by John on
Thu Nov 12, 13:42 EST 2009

Hi Andrew,

I'm interested in climbing East Dix from the east via the Bouquet valley.  I have read your description of the approach via The Great Slide on E. Dix.  I would like to know if you (or any of your readers) know whether there is a trail (unmarked or otherwise) that goes up the ridge over Spotted Mt and on to E. Dix, avoiding the slide route althogether?  On the map of the High Peaks, there is oviously nothing marked, but it looks like it would be a logical approach.

John

 

 

 

 

 

#240 re: East Dix (in reply-to message #239) Posted by Andrew on
Thu Nov 12, 18:49 EST 2009

Hello.

I know that people do Spotted Mountain with E. Dix.  Not sure about the conditions of any herd path,though.  The brush does seem to be less thick in this area, though.  That might help.

#241 WInter hiking Posted by David on
Sun Dec 13, 22:21 EST 2009

Hi Andrew,

Do you usually use crampons for winter hikes and climbs? I'm planning a 46er hike/climb for January and I'm wondering if snowshoes will be sufficient for climbing Cliff.

Thanks for your help. 

#242 re: WInter hiking (in reply-to message #241) Posted by Andrew on
Mon Dec 14, 07:49 EST 2009

Hi, David

In January, there's a good chance you'll only need snowshoes -- albeit you should try and use ones that have very aggressive cramponing on the outside edge of the shoe (I find many have some teeth under the foot, but that doesn't work too well on steep surfaces that are concave).

Now, there's always the chance in the winter that there will be conditions that merit the use of crampons instead.   You'll have to decide that before you head out, based on the recent weather and trail reports, etc.  If it has been recently warm and then has frozen solid without significant new snow, you might indeed need crampons.

If you are going up the really cliffy side of Cliff (which I've never done - I've always done the 'winter' route on the northern side), that might increase the likelihood of needing snowshoes (its a steep, south-facing slope and that might mean more overall ice).

 

David wrote:

Hi Andrew,

Do you usually use crampons for winter hikes and climbs? I'm planning a 46er hike/climb for January and I'm wondering if snowshoes will be sufficient for climbing Cliff.

Thanks for your help. 

 

 

#243 re: WInter hiking (in reply-to message #242) Posted by David on
Mon Dec 14, 12:20 EST 2009

 

Andrew wrote:

Hi, David

In January, there's a good chance you'll only need snowshoes -- albeit you should try and use ones that have very aggressive cramponing on the outside edge of the shoe (I find many have some teeth under the foot, but that doesn't work too well on steep surfaces that are concave).

Now, there's always the chance in the winter that there will be conditions that merit the use of crampons instead.   You'll have to decide that before you head out, based on the recent weather and trail reports, etc.  If it has been recently warm and then has frozen solid without significant new snow, you might indeed need crampons.

If you are going up the really cliffy side of Cliff (which I've never done - I've always done the 'winter' route on the northern side), that might increase the likelihood of needing snowshoes (its a steep, south-facing slope and that might mean more overall ice).

 

David wrote:

Hi Andrew,

Do you usually use crampons for winter hikes and climbs? I'm planning a 46er hike/climb for January and I'm wondering if snowshoes will be sufficient for climbing Cliff.

Thanks for your help. 

 

 

Andrew,

Thanks for the quick response and the info. We're planning to retrace your steps from your March 14, 2009 trip. It looks like a fairly moderate climb based on your pictures and description (your pictures are fantastic). We'll pay close attention to the weather reports leading up to the hike, hopefully we can get by with snowshoes since none of us currently have crampons! BTW - great website, its an invaluable resource - thank you.

#244 GPS tracklogs Posted by John on
Tue Jan 05, 10:44 EST 2010

Hi Andrew,

I too am planning to climb Cliff Mt. this month via your winter route.  My question is - can you tell me how to transfer your tracklog to my Garmin E-trex Vista GPS?  I have accessed gpsu.co.uk and also have the mapping software provided by Garmin which allows me to download specific maps into the unit, but I can't get them to "talk" to each other.  What  I'd like to do is overlay your route onto a topo which I can then import into the GPS, but I seem to be particularly challenged when it comes to digital matters.  Any help/advice you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

John

#245 re: GPS tracklogs (in reply-to message #244) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Jan 05, 19:34 EST 2010

Hi, John

The two programs don't talk to each other directly -- you use Garmin Mapsource to download the topo maps into your GPS, and you use GPS Utility to download my track into your GPS.   It's the GPS that overlays the two together on its display.

...Andrew

#246 Standard GPS file format Posted by Yury on
Thu Jan 07, 22:54 EST 2010

Hi Andrew,

Am I correct that you use GPSU file format because of historical reasons?
Is this format better than .gpx?

Yury

P.S. I am asking this question because I use .gdb format for my internal archive and .gpx format to exchange with my friends and upload to everytrail.com; recently I uninstalled GPSU from my computer.

#247 re: Standard GPS file format (in reply-to message #246) Posted by Andrew on
Fri Jan 08, 08:04 EST 2010

Hi, Yury

No, the GPSU format is not any better.  I have been intending to add support for .gpx for some time now, because it is a very widely supported format that pretty much everyone can read.  That is still on my list of things to do!

#248 re: Standard GPS file format (in reply-to message #247) Posted by Yury on
Fri Jan 08, 10:35 EST 2010

Thank you Andrew,

I will reinstall GPSU again. :(

Yury

#249 Thanks Posted by Jon Cammarata on
Tue Feb 02, 12:02 EST 2010

Hi Andrew,

Just wanted to say thanks for being so incredibly thorough, and detailed with all your hikes. I use your web site constantly, to help me research each and every high peak hike I do. I'm an aspiring 46er, with just over halfway there, with 24 down. Your site has been indispensable in helping me plan the routes I take, the time it'll take, etc. I love the last page of every hike, where you show the route, the time, the elevation gain and even the cross-section of elevation. Lastly, I must also pat you on the back for your excellent photography skills. Your photos really help inspire me (and my hiking buddies), to get back out there as soon as possible. You have a great eye. Thanks for lugging all that heavy, bulky photography equipment up and down the mountains for us all to enjoy! Most sincerely, Jon Cammarata

#250 re: Thanks (in reply-to message #249) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Feb 02, 17:03 EST 2010

 Hi, Jon

Wow. That's a very generous set of compliments.   Thanks very much, and I'm glad you are finding the site useful.

...Andrew

#251 Marshall to Iroquois? Posted by Jon Cammarata on
Fri Feb 05, 12:44 EST 2010

Hi Andrew,

I've got Wright and Algonquin under my belt, but because I was bonking really badly at the time, I had to skip Iroquois on that trip while my friends conquered it, which infuriates me! In addition, we also decided to cancel going up Marshall the next morning.

So, I was curious if it'd be possible to first ascend Marshall via Herbert Brook trail, then bushwhack north, down into Cold Brook Pass. Then continue bushwhacking north to ascend Iroquois, passing the Shepard's Tooth along the way. We'd likely just continue north past Boundary Peak, then head east, down the yellow ADK trail #71. back to camp at the Flowed Lands. What do you think? Is this crazy? Is it possible? Have you ever done this, (especially in the summer months)?

Would it make more sense to do it the other way around, (doing Iroquois first, then over to Marshall)?

 

Man, I wish there were better trails to connect the entire Macintyre range, including Marshall, but since there aren't, I have to ask you about this insane scenario.

By the way, we'd be doing this in the summertime or early fall.

 

Please give me your honest opinion.

#252 re: Marshall to Iroquois? (in reply-to message #251) Posted by Andrew on
Fri Feb 05, 17:47 EST 2010

Yes, it's doable.

It's a bit of a thrash in spots, but doable.  Even though there is supposedly an old herdpath leading over from Marshall's summit to Cold Brook Pass, I've never consistently found the whole thing on my several bushwhacks on this stretch.

As for the bit from Cold Brook Pass to the Shepherd's tooth... well, it is steep in spots but if you follow a decent line it isn't too bad.   I did this only once (last Winter) going uphill.  I'd try for the uphill direction simply because it's easier to find a working line up through the cliffs than to descend down through them.

I don't know if you have a GPS, but if you do, you should use my tracklogs (especially for the bit from Cold Brook Pass to the Shepherd's Tooth).

So... it'll be a decently challenging day, but it isn't an overly crazy objective.  Good routefinding is the thing that'll help the most.

My trip reports that involve the sections mentioned above are:

Marshall (2003)

Marshall (2006)

Shepherds Tooth (2009)

 

#253 re: Marshall to Iroquois? (in reply-to message #252) Posted by David on
Wed Feb 17, 12:59 EST 2010

My friends and I tried to bushwack from Iroquois to Marshall last August with no success. We started following a fairly well defined trail from Iroquois that lead into some very thick brush, but the trail ended there after only about 50 feet. The brush was very thick and the black flies were out in full force that day, even though it was dry weather and in August, so it got pretty miserable pretty fast and we decided to cut our losses and head back down the way we had come up. Using GPS and the track logs would be key to pulling this off - we had a GPS but lacked the track logs.

#254 Nye & Street Posted by Dan S. on
Fri Mar 26, 22:14 EDT 2010

Enjoy your site immensely!  Based on your advice from two years ago I use a Garmin 60CSx and really like it – thanks for that.

Our group is still relatively new to climbing with 10 of the high peaks climbed to date.We are planning a late April/early May climb to Nye & Street. I noticed that your track log was different than the trail described in both Barbara McMartin’s and Tony Goodwin’s books. The difference is after the Indian Pass Brook crossing. Your log goes south of the small brook instead of crossing to the north side and then returning to the south side.  Those books describe enamel pots and pans and an old cast iron stove at that part of the trail. Just wondering why your track log is different as I have it loaded into my Garmin and wanted to follow it.

My other question is whether it makes sense to climb Nye & Street at this time of the year – how difficult is it to cross Indian Pass Brook?
Thanks again for a great web site and source of information.
#255 re: Nye & Street (in reply-to message #254) Posted by Andrew on
Sat Mar 27, 04:56 EDT 2010

Hi there.

When I did it, I followed what was the most obvious / well-defined herd path (in fact in was quite a nice little section).  I do vaguely remember there being another choice.  I think you'd be ok with either choice.

...Andrew

P.S. glad you like the site and your GPS.

Dan S. wrote:

Enjoy your site immensely!  Based on your advice from two years ago I use a Garmin 60CSx and really like it – thanks for that.

Our group is still relatively new to climbing with 10 of the high peaks climbed to date.We are planning a late April/early May climb to Nye & Street. I noticed that your track log was different than the trail described in both Barbara McMartin’s and Tony Goodwin’s books. The difference is after the Indian Pass Brook crossing. Your log goes south of the small brook instead of crossing to the north side and then returning to the south side.  Those books describe enamel pots and pans and an old cast iron stove at that part of the trail. Just wondering why your track log is different as I have it loaded into my Garmin and wanted to follow it.

My other question is whether it makes sense to climb Nye & Street at this time of the year – how difficult is it to cross Indian Pass Brook?
Thanks again for a great web site and source of information.

 

 

#256 Augest 2010 backpack Posted by kenneywallace on
Sat Mar 27, 23:38 EDT 2010

I have a trip planed

 

day 1
hike in from lodge to phelps trail hike phelps mt return
hike to indian falls and bag tabletop and TR mountains
hike to lake arnold and set up camp

Day 2
hike mt. colden from arnold
move camp to feldspar broke

(this leavs a good half a day open, any ideas on what to hit for the rest of the day?)

day 3
Hike too lake tear of the clouds then hike skylight return to lake tear and hike gray peak, go directly to marcy from gray
return to feldspar broke

day 4 (any day that is a rain day possably)
hike cliff mountain, and possably redfeild and return to camp

day 5
hike out through avalanche pass back to the lodge


all days are around 8 miles a day or so

is this doable and is it possable to bag more peaks in the area, if so which ones, and any sugestions to change in the plans?

I am espicialy intrested if its possable to do cliff and redfeild in the same day and how hard is it to go directly to marcy from grays summit

#257 re: Augest 2010 backpack (in reply-to message #256) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Mar 28, 00:53 EDT 2010

What's "TR mountains"?  Tabletop Range?

On Day 2, if you arrive early, you could possibly do Cliff or Redfield or Skylight.  That would then give you more flexibility for the following day.

It is possible to do Cliff and Redfield in a day.  Just make sure you start early to deal with any routefinding issues you might have.

The only other peak in the area that would be sort of reasonable is Marshall.

It is possible to go directly to Marcy from Gray.  There is a faint but followable herdpath from the summit of Gray to treeline on Marcy.  From treeline just make your way up through the alpine to the summit.   If you have a GPS, I have a detailed tracklog of the direct route from Gray's summit to Marcy summit.

...Andrew


 

#258 Posted by kenneywallace on
Sun Mar 28, 13:23 EDT 2010

TR http://www.summitpost.org/mountain/rock/275424/t-r-mountain.html it the small peak oppisite of tabletop mountian, just recntly named, number 52 or 53 in hight

 

Buying a gps soon as i get my taxes back, so i will defently have one,

 

is their a sizable cliff on the direct rout from gray to marcy? i read about one somwhere

and defently would like to bag marshall, depends on if i get more than my sister to go with me

 

and feldspar broke, how many camping spots are in that area? want to make sure its liable i will get a spot their, uphill broke would be ok too, but i always hear about the spots being overly popular, and rather not camp at colden due to all the bears

#259 re: (in reply-to message #258) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Mar 28, 15:04 EDT 2010

There's not really any cliff between gray and marcy - just a sharp little descent at one point (well, along the herdpath there isn't -- maybe if you got off-track there might be).

Unfortunately, I'm not that great of a person to ask about camping at either Uphill or Feldspar (since I've never camped up there, only down at Lake Colden).   I suppose if you took a tent you could always find a flattish spot nearby - there seems to be a decent amount of flat ground around there.

kenneywallace wrote:

TR http://www.summitpost.org/mountain/rock/275424/t-r-mountain.html it the small peak oppisite of tabletop mountian, just recntly named, number 52 or 53 in hight

 

Buying a gps soon as i get my taxes back, so i will defently have one,

 

is their a sizable cliff on the direct rout from gray to marcy? i read about one somwhere

and defently would like to bag marshall, depends on if i get more than my sister to go with me

 

and feldspar broke, how many camping spots are in that area? want to make sure its liable i will get a spot their, uphill broke would be ok too, but i always hear about the spots being overly popular, and rather not camp at colden due to all the bears

 

 

#260 Posted by kenneywallace on
Sun Mar 28, 15:58 EDT 2010

was planning on tent camping anyways, the only thing is no camping above 3500 ft less their is a desinated spot, kinda hard to tell by map withen a few 100 ft of where the 3500 ft line is, and mostly imposable to find the "perfect flat spot" on the topo, (etheir the nat geo map i got or the ADK high peak guid i have)

 

defently have to camp though for the far peaks way in, 5-6 hour drive for me too the high peaks, catskill range is alot closer to me

 

hopfuly all in all i will be at about 13 peaks climbed this year (maybe more if my freind the mountian goat has to climb some (he probly would go for haystack after marcy on day 3)), for 14 of the 46 (my first was oddly east dix)

 

BTW exelent site, very helpful in reserching, (especialy in giving my somewhat mountian climbing nie-eve sister an idea what she has to do to condition for the high peaks after thinking hurricane mt was extreamly hard last year)

 

 

#261 Hike May 8th Posted by Barry Unger on
Wed May 05, 23:07 EDT 2010

Hi all,

New to this area would like to hike a peak with some locals. Please give a call.

Cheers,

Barry

347-346-2983

#262 Climbs Posted by Thomas s on
Thu Aug 12, 23:46 EDT 2010

Ever try Owl's head mountian of keene? or Mt. Van Hovenberg? Two smaller peaks with views as good as some of the bigger peaks...... van havenberg from just above the lodge, a good choice for a team building hike, and if you can spot a car, you can hike down the olypic bob sled track about a mile down from the summit on the oppisite side of the mountian

 

and Big Slide from yard, is yard a decent climb, less step then the brothers side?

is their anything to see from yard?

(im taking someone hiking who can handle distance, but long long rock scrambles hurt, they are in love with big slide, and jay mountian so idk how to aproch it with them


#263 re: Climbs (in reply-to message #262) Posted by Andrew on
Fri Aug 13, 17:18 EDT 2010

I've seen (from a distance) and known of Owl's Head and Mt Van Hoevenberg, yes, but have not done them (yet, at any rate).

I have done Yard.   There's a few minor semi-lookouts, but nothing too special.   It's a much less travelled way to get up Big Slide, though.   It is a less steep approach than from the direct route, and the final bit at the top is not nearly as steep when approaching from Yard.

Jay mountain is indeed a hidden gem.   Not a hard ascent, great views, and quiet.

 

...Andrew

#264 Posted by thomas on
Mon Sep 06, 22:43 EDT 2010

their defently good hikes, short at that, but good especialy if you want to explore the woods for being woods, and not have the huge climb (well mt van. atlease, owls is just short)

have read your page about jay, and actuly  your page is what i turn to to preview what the high peaks can bring for me atlease when i can get up their, (long drive) catskill take up most my  time theis days (try the devils path if you ever get down that way, very challanging, as step as any of the hike peaks, just shorter climbs (4600 feet total gain over 2 mountians in roughly 2 miles))

 

#265 directions to Mt. Marcy Posted by rtd on
Sat Sep 18, 09:23 EDT 2010

My daughter and I are heading up to the ADK's for a fall camping trip......I need directions from the Syracuse area to the head of the hiking trail at Mt. Marcy. Thanks!

#266 re: directions to Mt. Marcy (in reply-to message #265) Posted by Andrew on
Sat Sep 18, 20:00 EDT 2010

Which trailhead?   Technically, there are three principal trailheads that are used as starting points for Mount Marcy.

...Andrew

#267 Thanks Posted by Auston on
Sun Sep 26, 07:54 EDT 2010

 Andrew - thank you for this great site. I spent a bit of time wandering in the hills here some years ago and would like to head back next summer to walk more of the 46. Your site has answered all my questions and then some. Hope to see you out on the trail.

#268 Sewards via calkins brooke Posted by thomas s on
Wed Oct 20, 16:18 EDT 2010

I was wondering what the road up to calkins brooke is like, ive herd this is the nicest aroach to the peak, would it be feasable to bring suplys in on some sort of pull cart to camp at the base of the herd path? as the trail/ road in is suposably flat/ mostly flat

 

and 2 what sort of scrambling does calkins brooke trail have? or is it a steepish dirt climb?

#269 re: Sewards via calkins brooke (in reply-to message #268) Posted by Andrew on
Wed Oct 20, 23:11 EDT 2010

Hi there.

Mostly yes, the route up to the beginning of the herdpath follows an old road, EXCEPT:

There is a section of trail (i.e. that does not follow the old road) along the main trail (i.e. the one that goes mostly east-west).   This section occurs not far before you get to the north-south road that leads south to the base of the caulkins brook herdpath.   The north-south road is wide from that point all the way almost to the base of the herd path.

So, as long as you don't mind hauling your cart through what is probably about 6/10ths of a mile's worth of narrow trail, the rest is o.k.

The caulkins brook route does not have any significant (in fact, not really any) scrambling.  It is a moderately-steep herdpath on forest soil throughout.

#270 re: Sewards via calkins brooke (in reply-to message #269) Posted by thomas s on
Thu Oct 21, 13:02 EDT 2010

no, the half a mile of narrowness shouldnt be a problime, makes a back country camping trip possably for my sister, and with all the good photos i see from donaldson looks like the perfect peak, asuming theirs water nearby in late july

 

calkins brooke gains the 2000 feet over 3 miles from the topo map so the grade shouldnt be bad (platteu mountian in the catskills from rt 214 gains 1800 feet in 7/10's of a mile on a mostly dirt path,(cant say the same for the  1/2 mile 1500 foot east rocky face))

#271 re: Sewards via calkins brooke (in reply-to message #270) Posted by Andrew on
Thu Oct 21, 17:05 EDT 2010

Caulkins Brook itself is very near to the start of the herd path, so water will not be a problem in July (or any other time of year, for that matter).

...Andrew

#272 46er! Posted by Katy on
Sun Jan 16, 21:23 EST 2011

Hey guys! I just turned 15 and I'm planning on doing all the 46 peaks in only 5 weeks! Im starting my trip in early july! Is there anything i should really be prepared for? Ive climbed four or five peaks up there before. Im so excited and ill let you all know how it goes when im done!

#273 re: 46er! (in reply-to message #272) Posted by Andrew on
Mon Jan 17, 21:49 EST 2011

Hi there!

An impressive goal, to be sure!   

Anything to be prepared for?  Most importantly will be for you to build up your hiking strength and endurance in advance, so that you'll be faster and less prone to injury when the time comes to do your 5-month bout of intense hiking.   That, and good lightweight synthetic clothes to deal with the inevitable periods of inclement weather that you'll probably have to deal with from time to time.

Let us know how it goes...

...Andrew

#274 Thanks Posted by CRC on
Fri Mar 04, 08:28 EST 2011

Spent last weekend hiking Mt. Donaldson, Mt. Emmons and Seward Mt.  Quite a bit of snow up there and there was more falling.  We were fortunate to have a couple of nice guys re-break the trail up Donaldson and Emmons but when we caught up to them, they made it apparent that they had not been sure of how to get over to Emmons.  I suppose that explained some of the dead end and looping tracks.  Because of the poor visibility, the lack of trail, the seven feet of snow and the many spruce traps, we didn't make it over Seward that same day.  But thanks to your wonderful GPS mapping, we did find our way to the top of Seward the next day.  So a shout out to Andrew, with thanks for this website and for your GPS mapping.

Happy trails 

#275 re: Thanks (in reply-to message #274) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Mar 06, 15:51 EST 2011

Glad my info could be of use!

...Andrew

#276 Dix Range loop hike. Posted by Andrew on
Wed Apr 20, 12:54 EDT 2011

I am planning on taking my dog with me and hiking the dix range in a loop but I was told last year that there is a point at which I might need a harness and rope to help my dog up somewhere around hough peak I believe, or it may be just where the trail from hough peak meets up with the dix trail.  Can anyone confirm or denigh?  I don't want to get that far out just to find I don't have the equipment to go on.  BTW my dog and I made it from basin to saddleback with a leash and ingenuity.

#277 re: Dix Range loop hike. (in reply-to message #276) Posted by Andrew on
Wed Apr 20, 13:09 EDT 2011

If you managed the cliffs on the far side of Saddleback with your dog, then you'll have no problem with the short cliffy bit of trail south of Hough's summit.   Saddleback's cliffy bit of trail is far harder than that.

...Andrew

Andrew wrote:

I am planning on taking my dog with me and hiking the dix range in a loop but I was told last year that there is a point at which I might need a harness and rope to help my dog up somewhere around hough peak I believe, or it may be just where the trail from hough peak meets up with the dix trail.  Can anyone confirm or denigh?  I don't want to get that far out just to find I don't have the equipment to go on.  BTW my dog and I made it from basin to saddleback with a leash and ingenuity.

 

 

#278 Dix Range Posted by B. Maier on
Wed May 04, 16:49 EDT 2011

I am planning to tackle the Dix Range this summer (2011).  We'd like to begin and end on 73.  Two years ago I followed the herd paths from 73 to the East Dix Slide so I am familiar with the lack of true trail markings.  However, I have read that traversing the entire Dix range can be challenging from a navigation and correct trail point of view as there is no clearly marked path/trail.  I have the topo trail map; however, can you provide me or direct me to a site with current information that would be helpful to my hike?  Any suggestions on the best path, meaning, start at Bouquet River or start at Round Pond?  Thanks for any information - I enjoy the information you provide on your webpage!

#279 cascade/ porter Posted by tom on
Sat May 07, 16:32 EDT 2011

planing on taking a cuple semi out of shape pepole to climb cascade and porter, managed to convence them to avoid giant as their first high peak,

i know casy is the simpleist to do, (been on the dix range myself)

 

this would be their 2nd and 3rd 4000 footer (their first was hunter on a 13 mile roundtrip from the long less step side

 

the question is how easy is the "easyest high peak" being i havent done this one, (my steepest is platteu mt. is the catskills 1800 feet in 7/10 of a mile, followed by east dix)

 

they can do scrambling with help but take almost 2x the time i take, so would figer 3 hours up to poter then back to cascade and a 1.5 hours down (my time), so would give them about 7-8 hours to do the peaks (less if we hike as much as i want to befor july), or am i overestimating the climb on cascade for a semi out of shape person

#280 re: Dix Range (in reply-to message #278) Posted by Andrew on
Mon May 09, 21:46 EDT 2011

 sorry for the tardy reply - I was on vacation last week.

To answer your question: yes, traversing the entire dix range can be challenging, but there is a fairly well defined herdpath for most of the 'non-trailed' parts.  I suggest you have a close look at the trackmaps of the more recent dix range climbs that I've done - those trackmaps show, in detail, where all of the herdpaths go on East Dix, Macomb, South Dix, and Hough.  I'm fairly sure that the herdpaths have not changed in any appreciable way since I last did these hikes.

As far as the best entry point goes, I'd suggest going in on the Boquet river approach and climbing the East Dix slide.  It's easier to climb up something like that than to descend it.

#281 re: cascade/ porter (in reply-to message #279) Posted by Andrew on
Mon May 09, 21:51 EDT 2011

Yes, Cascade is the easiest 4000-footer in the Adirondacks, and there is only a little bit of scrambling at the top.

All of my trip reports (except the earliest ones) have detailed trackmaps and hike data that give you a good idea of how long the trips will take.   Please refer to my last outing on Cascade from last year, where I took my entire work team up there (link included below).   Even on that trip, with over ten people, some of them not in the best of shape, it took us less than 4 and a half hours.   

alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2010/06-08-Cascade/index.jsp

If you also add Porter, that is probably only an extra hour on top of that.

#282 Sewards and Santanonis Posted by Peter on
Tue Jul 26, 11:20 EDT 2011

i would very much appreciate any help with my upcoming climbs of sewards and santanonis.  My time is limited. I am in good climbing shape and will proabably be doing it alone. Any advice? Any key landmarks? Any good recent helpful reports for both these regions? I plan on going to Upper works - one day doing Allen and then the next day doing the three Santanonis.   Then on to the Sewards. How can I do these in one long day? If I go the calkins route is it clearly marked. So, any advice or links would be so helpful. I plan on going the first week of August. thanks for the feedback.

 

Peter

#283 re: Sewards and Santanonis (in reply-to message #282) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Jul 26, 11:30 EDT 2011

Hi.  Have you looked at my trip reports for the sewards and seymour (available on this site)?   They have lots of detailed information, including annotated trackmaps, that will give you the information you are looking for.  I have included direct links below for convenience.

alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/Seymour2003

alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2006/01-29-Seymour/

alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2004/Sewards2004_2/

alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2006/01-22-Sewards/

#284 cascade vs other easy 4k pks Posted by thomas on
Wed Oct 05, 20:46 EDT 2011

i am wondering if theirs any other peaks as easy to do as cascade mountian that are high peaks (north east 111 peaks)

 

i know hunter and slide in the catskills are rediculsy easy, they are for all purposes my back yard, ive done slide once and its kinda dull, hunter 2 times, with the tower its great,

 

my sisters max skill leavle allows her to do nothing harder then cascade mt.

maybe abraham and ellen in vermount? any others in new hampshire or maine as easy?

 

and oh ya, a exelent traverse if your looking for training is the catskills devils path, 21 miles and about 12,000 feet of elevation, (all which comes in around 6-8 miles, the rest is flat) steep, rocky, lots of small awkward scrambles, good veiws (best is a 270 dergree veiw from south twin)

 

 

#285 re: cascade vs other easy 4k pks (in reply-to message #284) Posted by Andrew on
Wed Oct 05, 22:20 EDT 2011

well, let's see... the other 'easy' 4k footers in the Adirondacks are probably:

  • Porter (right next to Cascade)
  • Phelps (a bit longer than Cascade but similar elevation gain)
  • Wright (a bit longer, and higher, but overall distance not too bad)

That's about it - everything else is more elevation gain and/or a lot longer distance.

In Vermont, Camel's Hump is not too bad, as is Abraham and/or Ellen.

...Andrew

#286 High Peaks Posted by Chris Dailey on
Tue Oct 11, 14:35 EDT 2011

Hi Andrew,

Thanks for all your trip reports and pics about hiking the 46 High Peaks.  I enjoyed reading up on each peak and the information I gathered from your site helped me when planning out my hiking trips.  I started hiking in the ADK's in June and just finished my 46th peak on Sunday and your write-ups and pictures helped let me know what to expect.

Thanks!

-Chris

#287 re: High Peaks (in reply-to message #286) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Oct 11, 17:16 EDT 2011

Hi, Chris

Glad to have been helpful!  Congrats on becoming a 46er!

#288 Loaned Cooking Pot Posted by Dennis on
Thu Oct 20, 15:12 EDT 2011

Not sure if this is an appropriate place to post this, but here goes:

To the person I loaned my cooking pot to at Marcy Dam on Sunday, August 14 (so you could continue your trip). Please return it as I have an upcoming trip.

You have my name and address.

 

#289 re: Loaned Cooking Pot (in reply-to message #288) Posted by Andrew on
Thu Oct 20, 18:26 EDT 2011

Hi, Dennis.   You might want to try posting on the more popular of the adirondack mountain message forums:

http://www.adkforum.com/

and

http://adkhighpeaks.com/forums/

...Andrew

#290 4k peaks Posted by thomas on
Fri Nov 04, 21:18 EDT 2011

thanks, judging by images and reports, thats what i thought about abraham, didnt think camles hump would be as easy though, it just looks harder,

 

i know from experince mansfeild from the road isnt that hard, although that trip turned into me getting caught in a storm, and acedently decending laura cowles to underhill state park and coming back up halfway house trail (kinda steep)

 

anything real easy in the whites? i got a week and a half to play with next year, and plan on climbing abraham on the way up from central new york, outside of 2 days (zip line at wildcat, and cog railway on washington, sister likes touristry stuff) i have probly 2 days to do somewhat easyer nh peaks (nothing much harder then cascade in the aderondacks) with her and her freind (out of shape)

 

any sugestions?

 

, and the rest i do with my freinds, a harder, but senic climb, the francoina range im thinking, but anything else as good? (dont have to be treeless but needs to be nice, clouds and rain i will bag the no veiwers for my ne 115)

rainy day peaks look like- waumbeck, hail, techumshe, mt. tom-

 

any sugestions for the must do climbs (and yes i will climb washington for real, the train dont count in my book)

 

and one last qestion, how does Old Speck compair to cascade in gain and dificulty (shes intrested in that one)?

 

thanks for the info, great site, good info

#291 re: 4k peaks (in reply-to message #290) Posted by Andrew on
Sat Nov 05, 23:26 EDT 2011

Hi.

Easiest [4k] stuff in the Whites?  Let's see - here's a few:

 

As far as the harder stuff goes, there are tons of scenic options, many of which you have already pointed out:

  • Anything along Franconia Ridge
  • The Bonds (West Bond, Bondcliff, Bond)
  • The Twins (North, South)
  • The entire Crawford Path from Crawford Notch to Mount Washington
  • Anything in the Presidential Range
  • Moosilauke

re: your last question:

Old Speck is 6.7 miles RT from Grafton Notch, with about 2700 feet of elevation gain.  By comparison, Cascade is 4.6 miles RT from Cascade Pass, with about 2000 feet of elevation gain.   So it _is_ harder, but only moderately so.   Info on the Old Speck hike here: http://alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2005/200506-Maine.

...Andrew

#292 High Peak Patches Posted by B&LOlson on
Mon Dec 19, 18:55 EST 2011

Does anyone know where we can purchase high peaks patches?

Thanks

#293 re: High Peak Patches (in reply-to message #292) Posted by Andrew on
Mon Dec 19, 20:41 EST 2011

What kind of patches do you mean?   What do these patches look like?

#294 Posted by thomas on
Mon Jan 23, 17:47 EST 2012

The Aderondack lodge in lake placid, the adk headquarters store in lake george, (coming south from albany get off at the first lake george exit, turn right in the direction of lake lurzurne, theirs a road on the left intermeaditly, with a log bui;lding, turn on their the store is right their)

 

or in keene valley stop at the mountianeer, (plan on them being closed by 7 pm though, only the noonmark and the ausable inn stay open later)

#295 June Hike Advice Posted by Uncle Griz on
Fri May 25, 10:29 EDT 2012

Hello! Some friends of mine and I want to take a hike in a few weeks. We're coming from Syracuse and Albany. We are all in decent shape and have tackled a few HPs. Looking for some recommendations on which peaks to take on next. If we could knock out 2 that would be sweet, but not necessary. Any help anyone can offer is much appreciated. Thank you!

#296 re: June Hike Advice (in reply-to message #295) Posted by Andrew on
Fri May 25, 20:09 EDT 2012

Hi.  Well, there are several 'two-peakers' that you could do.   First of all, though, which ones have you already done?

...Andrew

#297 Thanks Posted by Penny on
Tue Jun 05, 14:48 EDT 2012

Hi Andrew, I fell in love with the High Peaks last fall after reaching the summit of Giant (Oct 29) and having a moment of awe. Done 15 so far, mostly by myself so I try not to take chances. Thank you for your extremely informative site! I always check to see what you have to say about trails, how long they are, elevation gain etc etc.  Just wanted you to know that this site has been very helpful and motivating for a 51 year old newbie. Thanks again!

#298 Posted by tom on
Sun Jul 29, 00:37 EDT 2012

Easyest high peaks to do- cascade/ porter is obvious, and already done, along with whiteface from the cheap way,

 

looking for a not so steep climb, some scambling but less cliffy climb, of a high peak, (relitive to the high peak trails)

gaint maybe? any others

#299 re: (in reply-to message #298) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Jul 29, 06:05 EDT 2012

If you want scrambling, the best I can think of is Catamount - but that's not a 4000-footer.

Wright is steep near the top, but is light on the scrambling part.

Colden via the trap dike is a great scramble, but that is verging on the technical, so I can't recommend without knowing more about your comfort with that sort of terrain.

Another good peak with the possibility of some easy scrambling is Noonmark - but is also a non-4000 footer.

Giant via the ridge trail is indeed nice, but there are only a few minor scrambly bits along the way. 

#300 Posted by tom on
Sun Jul 29, 15:36 EDT 2012

i enjoy scambling myself, more so with a mixed trail, long single type terane trals get dull, im confertable with most stuff thats not a wide open cliff, my sister is conferable with low angle  stuff, thats smother/slab rather then chimny type stuff, she can do angles, but not cliffy type stuff, (well anything thats more then 2 feet per "step")

Giant is her ultimate goal, outside of the ADK fire towers (stuff like adams,lyon, poke-o0moonshine)

shes been up cascade with me and did ok, but at a slowish pace 6-7 hours RT,

where i climbed Mt masfeild up and down form underhill in 3 hours

When I vacation i got to think of What she can handle more then what i want to do, with me haveing alot more knolage of the catskills, (6 hour drive, vs a 2 hour drive) im not always the best judge by what the book says

#301 Advice Welcomed Posted by Scott on
Sat Aug 04, 13:14 EDT 2012

I am 53 and a litlle overweight and am an ex-smoker (quit 12 years ago).  I am interested in knowing which of the high peaks is the easiest.  I am working to get in shape and it is my hope and prayer that I will be able to someday do all 46.  If someone is willing to share a recommended packing list for a one-day hike and some wisdom and tips, that would be greatly appreciated.  I was somewhat overwhelmed looking at the number of different backpacks that are available and walked out fearing no matter what I bought I would be wrong.  If the advice or list is something you would email, my email is goodguy@twcny.rr.com.  All advice and encouragement is welcomed.  I have plenty of discouragers who think I am having a midlife crisis.  They may be right but I miss the times years gone by when I would hike and just be grateful for all that nature is.  I feel old because I live as if I am old.  I am going to change that.

Andrew, I am thankful for your website and your passion.  I will continue to read it for the inspiration that it gives me.  I want to see for myself many of the things that your pictures show.  I hope that our paths one day cross.  That, too, would be a blessing in my life.

Warm Regards,
Scott

 

#302 re: Advice Welcomed (in reply-to message #301) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Aug 05, 08:39 EDT 2012

 Scott,

Let me start by saying that I am pretty firm in my position that it is not "too late" to start hiking.   If it gives you fulfillment, do it (and if at some point in the future it no longer does, then you stop).

The easiest forty-sixer in the Adirondacks is Cascade Mountain, via the Cascade trailhead on route 73.   It also happens to be a very scenic summit.

My recommended packing list for a summer day hike is this:

  • Good hiking boots (although realistically, for a short hike like Cascade, you can use sneakers so long as the conditions are dry)
  • Cotton clothes are generally not advised, because they do not dry quickly and suck the heat out of you when wet (e.g. in the event of a sudden thunderstorm, etc).   Synthetic hiking shirt / pants are best.
  • Topographic map
  • Compass
  • Sunscreen
  • Sunglasses
  • Matches / Lighter
  • Whistle
  • Snacks (trail mix, sandwich, your favorite candy, etc)
  • A couple of litres of water (more if you are going on a long day hike)
  • A rain jacket of some sort
  • A light fleece jacket
  • A headlamp or flashlight

Now, some of these things are almost never going to be needed on a short summer hike - the general idea is that you've got some safety gear in case something goes wrong and you are stuck somewhere for some reason.   Most people don't bother with many of the above items for a short hike, but they are the standard essentials, technically (probably I should have added a small first aid kit to the list, come to think of it).

...Andrew

P.S. Thanks for the nice words regarding the website.   Indeed, perhaps we shall cross paths one day!

#303 Help selecting a peak Posted by Margo on
Wed Aug 22, 20:41 EDT 2012

Hi. I am from Idaho and working in the area for a couple weeks. I was here in May and with a co-worker climbed Porter and Cascade. I have no co-workers that are hikers with me on this trip though. I have climbed a lot, out west, idaho, wy and colorado. I would like your recommendation for a couple peaks that would be straightforward (ie., would make for a good 1-day solo) and have relatively easy access as i may only have a sedan to get to a trailhead. I don't care if it is popular peak. since i'll be on my own, running into others wouldnt be a problem. could you come up with a list of 4-5 that might meet these criteria and i'll see what i can knock off before i head home. Thanks and thanks for a really useful website..

#304 re: Help selecting a peak (in reply-to message #303) Posted by Andrew on
Wed Aug 22, 22:38 EDT 2012

Hi, Margo.

Probably the most straightforward in combination with scenic would be:

  • Wright Peak and/or
  • Algonquin Peak (both of these two can be done in a single day if you are up for it)
  • Gothics is pretty nice too, but has a longer hike in
  • Giant is fairly short and scenic, assuming you take the "ridge trail".   The summit is nice but not fully open, though. 

Looking at any of my trip reports for these peaks will give you a better idea of what they are like, of course.

#305 re: Help selecting a peak (in reply-to message #304) Posted by Margo on
Thu Aug 23, 21:07 EDT 2012

Thank you for your thoughts. a coworker has been working on the 46ers and is loaning me his book, which will be helpful on the trail. He also mentioned Algonquin as a solo option. he actually discussed Ridge Runner too, which i think combine a number of these peaks. he said you can bail about anytime on it. It's amazing how many you've done. we have 10,000 peaks in Idaho, so i don't have to repeat so many, but i have my share. Sometimes you just gotta show someone else how great it is!!! 

Are all the peaks you suggested for me fairly well marked? thanks again.

#306 re: Help selecting a peak (in reply-to message #305) Posted by Andrew on
Thu Aug 23, 23:56 EDT 2012

Hi, Margo

Yes, very well marked.   Note that the trailhead for Wright / Algonquin is a pay-parking area ($10) and one of the trailheads for Gothics is a $5 pay-parking area.  

I'd gladly trade a few Idaho mountains for a few Adirondack mountains once in a while.   I do enjoy the more rugged mountaineering type of mountains now and again, and there's virtually none of that in eastern North America.   I really should do something in Idaho someday - mostly when I'm out west I'm heading to southern Utah or the Sierra or the North Cascades or the BC coast or something along those lines.  

As you aptly put it, there's so many more big peaks in Idaho; and not only in Idaho, mind you, but out west in general!

...Andrew

#307 re: Help selecting a peak (in reply-to message #305) Posted by Margo on
Sat Aug 25, 22:53 EDT 2012

Well, I did Algonquin, Boundary, Iroquoi and Wright today...with a gazillion other people so didn't have to worry too much about getting lost. I hiked in that order and tagged along with a party of four (their invite) from Iroquoi on back. Long day but worth it. They invited me to stay and do Marcy tomorrow, but i couldn't do that. Other than one blister and one hot spot (probably cuz it is so much hotter here and my feet probably really swelled...) all is good. They have nearly convinced me to do Marcy before i leave. Not sure i'll have the opportunity...so any chance you would know the mileage/elevation for what i did today? I didn't have room to pack my gps (or my hiking poles) on the flight to know. That might help me decide on Marcy or to try something else you suggested. Thanks for all your help!

#308 re: Help selecting a peak (in reply-to message #307) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Aug 26, 11:14 EDT 2012

Hi, Margo

You did approximately 10 miles of overall distance and 3600-ish feet of elevation gain.   Marcy is longer, but less overall elevation gain (just under 16 miles total and about 3100 feet of elevation gain).

...Andrew 

#309 re: Help selecting a peak (in reply-to message #308) Posted by Margo on
Sun Aug 26, 11:18 EDT 2012

Thanks Andrew. You Rock!!

#310 Colden's SE Slide Posted by Ethan on
Wed Sep 26, 12:50 EDT 2012

Andrew, I just wanted to say thanks for the excellent site, I have spent many hours looking over your trip reports and have enjoyed every minute of it!  I live just outside of Plattsburgh so the Adirondacks has become my stomping ground for many a good hike.  My good friend and I just got back from an overnighter to Lake Arnold.  Hiked in from the Loj, set up camp and had lunch, then ascended Colden from the SE slide.  From the summit made our way back down to Arnold and spent the night.  The next morning we packed up camp and headed out via Indian Falls.  Thank you for inspiring the ascent!  I posted the trip on FaceBook if you wanted to check it out.

Again, thanks for the reports and inspiration!

Ethan Stansbury

#311 Seeking advice Posted by Brian on
Wed Sep 26, 14:30 EDT 2012

 I haven't been to the Adirondacks since I was a child. At present, I am unable to climb/hike. I will be traveling in the Raquette Lake/Blue Mountain Lake/Newcomb areas this weekend, looking for photo opportunities. While I'm certain I'll have unlimited choices for pictures of nature and bodies of water, I wondered if you might have some tips for where to go for vistas of some of the high peaks. My memories of the area are that the highways are largely flanked by trees, and views are rather obstructed until you come upon a village or lake, etc.  Does anyone have advice on any highways, or local backroads that might provide good views of some peaks, for photo purposes? Thanks, folks.

#312 re: Seeking advice (in reply-to message #311) Posted by Andrew on
Wed Oct 03, 11:38 EDT 2012

Well... in the town of Newcomb, there is a small park / monument area at the east end of the town (I think) that offers some views north to the central high peaks.   Also at the causeway crossing of Long Lake in Long Lake, there's a distant view up towards the Sewards. 

...Andrew

#313 GPS Posted by Bill on
Wed Nov 07, 16:26 EST 2012

Andrew,

Awesome website! I regulary use it to research and plan hikes. Started hiking 3 years ago when my son's 5th grade teacher discussed NYS geography noting Marcy's prominence. Each year his teacher challenged students to be the first (he taught) to reach the summit. After first climbing Marcy and 9 other peaks, we are on our way to becoming ADK 46ers!

I recently bought a Garmin GPS but haven't been able to plot hikes in Google Earth terrain view in 3D. Not sure if it's a google version issue, graphics issue with my laptop or if I need to download an image and overlay it on google maps.

Could you explain how you got the 3D terrain view? Thanks in advance for your assistance.

Bill

 

 

#314 re: GPS (in reply-to message #313) Posted by Andrew on
Thu Nov 08, 19:51 EST 2012

Hi, Bill

Thank you for the kind words regarding my website.   In regards to your question about how I create my trackmaps with the terrain view: I have some custom software that I wrote that takes my GPS tracklogs and my pictures, correlates them together, and then uses the Google Maps programming interface to mash it all together into a web-viewable map.  But, I don't think that is the direction in which you want to go.

I think what you want is a way to take a track file and have it rendered in Google Earth.   You won't need to mess with versions or any sort of graphics;  all you need to do is import a track file into Google Earth.  More specifically, you need a track that is KML-formatted.   Now, although I do provide track files for each of my hikes on my website, I currently don't provide a KML version of them (yet - I will at some point).   For now, I'll offer you this: let me know what track or tracks you are interested in, and I'll create .kml-formatted versions of them. 

...Andrew

#315 suggested hiking Posted by chris molgat on
Wed May 22, 13:37 EDT 2013
Hello andrew, Would appreciate your hiking suggestions. My wife and I will be camping in the KOA in Wilmington(early June) and arriving there by noon. What short after-noon hike would you suggest (so as to get warmed up) as well as your suggestion for the next day when we have from morning to late after-noon? If possible prefer trials not excessively frequented and of a reasonable challenge. We have already done Marcy many years back. Thank you in advance! Chris
#316 re: suggested hiking (in reply-to message #315) Posted by Andrew on
Wed May 22, 15:37 EDT 2013

Hi.  If you want something out of the way and not far from the Wilmington KOA, how about Catamount?  It is fairly close to your campground (perhaps 10 miles drive away), it is short, not often visited, and has a nice bit of scrambling and a few nice open sections along the way to the summit.

/Outdoors/FeatureReports/Adirondacks/?p=peakdetail&peakname=catamount

 Note that the trailhead is not well-marked, so have a look at my trip reports and carefully note the map(s) and pictures showing the starting point. 

 For a longer, less-frequented hike - you could do Jay Peak - also in the general vicinity of your campground. 

/Outdoors/FeatureReports/Adirondacks/?p=peakdetail&peakname=catamount

 

 

#317 re: suggested hiking (in reply-to message #316) Posted by chris molgat on
Thu May 23, 11:01 EDT 2013
Hello Andrew, thanks for the quick resposne. Will look into both Catamount and Jay Peak. Had done searching on the side, what are your thoughts on Porter or Cascade for the half day? And what about Iroquois, Algonqui, Whiteface, Giant, Wright or Big Slide for the day hike? Sorry to be a pest, these are simply other names that seemed recommended as well. Thanks you for your time and patience!! Chris
#318 re: suggested hiking (in reply-to message #317) Posted by Andrew on
Thu May 23, 11:14 EDT 2013
Hi, Chris 

Yes, those are all excellent peaks - but didn't mention them because of their popularity (i.e. solitude was one of your criteria).    By all means, if you don't mind the potential for busy-ness, those are all excellent (and higher) peaks.   Maybe of all of those, Iroquois has the best combination of excellent summit and not too busy.  If you want a fairly long but very scenic route that includes Iroquois, I recommend a loop starting at ADK loj that goes through Avalanche Pass, up to the saddle between Algonquin and Iroquois, over to Iroquois, then back directly over Algonquin and down to the loj. 

Description of this loop here:

/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2005/AlgonquinIroquois2005/ 

#319 re: suggested hiking (in reply-to message #318) Posted by chris molgat on
Thu May 23, 11:23 EDT 2013
Thanks Andrew, What about for the half day trip? Between Cascade & Porter, which one would you suggest? Cheers and many thanks!! Chris
#320 re: suggested hiking (in reply-to message #319) Posted by Andrew on
Thu May 23, 13:03 EDT 2013
Cascade and Porter can easily be done in half a day (from the Cascade Pass trailhead).   A longer trip  starting from Marcy Field is a longer (full day) and more scenic and varied alternative, though.   Note that this option is a traverse.
#321 re: suggested hiking (in reply-to message #320) Posted by chris molgat on
Thu May 23, 13:13 EDT 2013
Thanks a bunch Andrew!! Will keep in touch and thanks for a great web site!! Chris
#322 A few hikes for 1st timers Posted by Bob Better on
Mon Jun 10, 07:59 EDT 2013
Good day to you Andrew,  My wife and I hike in the northeast, almost excluslively in NH, although we have hiked in some of the national parks.  We are in our late 60s.  We are planning a week at Schroon Lake in mid August and hope to hike at least a few days.  I found your website and was very appreciatave that you are willing to share your experiences in the Dacks.  Your Jay Peak and Nun-Da-Ga-O Ridge hikes look tailor made for us.  If you have further suggestions, I would appreciate hearing from you.  thanks very much for sharing your trip reports.  Bob Better, NH 
#323 re: A few hikes for 1st timers (in reply-to message #322) Posted by Andrew on
Mon Jun 10, 08:36 EDT 2013

Hi, Bob 

Glad you find the site useful.   Given that you are in Schroon Lake, and based on the two hikes that caught your interest, I'd also recommend Noonmark.    It's short, has lots of scenic views along the way (from the north approach) and a great summit.   I'm sure you'll like it. 

 ...Andrew 

#324 Street/Nye Posted by Joy C on
Thu Jun 27, 19:43 EDT 2013
Has anyone been up Street & Nye recently? I know that these are bushwacks but have heard that there is a pretty good herd trail. Headed up there July 5 or 6 with my bf. Thanks!!
#325 re: Street/Nye (in reply-to message #324) Posted by Andrew on
Sat Jun 29, 12:26 EDT 2013

I don't know about any recent deadfall, but yes, the herdpath up Street and Nye is quite good.   Since it is a herd path it probably has poor to no signage, so you may want to use one of my tracklogs as a guide.  (if you have a GPS) 


...Andrew 

#326 re: Street/Nye (in reply-to message #325) Posted by Bob H. on
Fri Jul 05, 08:39 EDT 2013
I climbed Street and Nye for the first time last weekend. The trail is well defined. But a word of caution: with all the rain - and there has been more every day since then - the first stream crossing was up to knee high and the current was swift. With boots off and using all fours, it was doable.
#327 re: A few hikes for 1st timers (in reply-to message #322) Posted by tom on
Sat Jul 20, 00:26 EDT 2013

nundagola ridge is a wonderful climb, if you do it dont forget to go up big crow a tenthe of a mile past the trail split, for no effort climbs with big rewards big crow is second only to belfry mountain near lincoln pond

 

jay mountian they just opened a new trail to the summit, so the climb may be a bit ifrent and a half a mile longer

#328 re: A few hikes for 1st timers (in reply-to message #327) Posted by Andrew on
Sun Jul 21, 08:40 EDT 2013

 Hmm... never been up Big Crow.   Will have to do it the next time I do nun-da-ga-o ridge. 

...Andrew 

#329 One Peak? Posted by Sean on
Tue Aug 20, 19:52 EDT 2013

 Driving through the Adirondacks mid to late Septemebr and have one day to do a good hike and climb.  My wife and I are experience and have summited in the Rockies and Alps.

What peak do you recommend?  

#330 re: One Peak? (in reply-to message #329) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Aug 20, 22:24 EDT 2013

 Well, depends on how long of a hike you want.   My recommendations based on distance: 

-really short (3 hours RT): Cascade Mountain  
-short (4-5 hours RT): Wright Peak 
-medium (6-7 hours RT): Giant via Ridge Trail  
-long (8+ hours RT): Haystack Mountain, or Mount Marcy, or Algonquin/Iroquois Loop via Avalanche Pass 

#331 lake tear of the clouds Posted by Jenny on
Sat Aug 24, 12:02 EDT 2013

My family and I are interested in just hiking to Lake Tear of the Clouds and back.  What trails would you suggest?  And how long do you feel this would take?

 

Wonderful site, and thank you for sharing

   

#332 re: lake tear of the clouds (in reply-to message #331) Posted by Andrew on
Sat Aug 24, 21:05 EDT 2013

Hi, Jenny 

The shortest route to Lake Tear of the Clouds starts at Adirondak Loj, goes past Marcy Dam, south past Lake Arnold and up Feldspar Brook.   The total one-way distance for this is about 6.5-7 miles (so 13-14 miles round trip).

 Length of time entirely depends on the fitness level and skill of your group.  I'd say at a minimum allow for an average speed of 1.2 miles per hour, which would yield an overall time of  eleven and a half hours.   However, that is a very conservative estimate that assumes you are walkind dead slow.  A more average pace would probably get it done in about nine to nine and a half hours.   With a quick pace you could do it in under eight.

I know you said that you wanted to go only as far as Lake Tear of the Clouds.  However, if you have even a little bit left in the tank once you get there, I highly recommend going to the top of Mt Skylight.     It is only an extra 0.5 miles of distance and 500 feet of gain.  Probably only an extra 30 minutes each way, and the view from its open summit terrain is superb.

 Hope this helps,

...Andrew 

#333 re: lake tear of the clouds (in reply-to message #331) Posted by jenny on
Mon Aug 26, 12:35 EDT 2013

Excellent Andrew.  That does help, and thanks to your suggestion we may just add Skylight.

 I wanted to ask, after looking at a few other blogs, some mention the trail crosses knee high water in places.  Do you know if this is still the case?  I think one part was near the Arnold lake area.

 

thanks again  

#334 re: lake tear of the clouds (in reply-to message #333) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Aug 27, 07:00 EDT 2013

 Hi.

Under normal circumstances, I can't think of any place on the trail past lake Arnold where you need to cross standing water. 

 

I recall there are some planks over the area around the outlet of lake Arnold, but you'd only have to cross that area if you were taking the trail up mt colden (which you wouldn't be doing if you are headed to lake tear of the clouds) 

...Andrew 

#335 dogs on mountain trails Posted by Rose on
Sun Sep 08, 21:23 EDT 2013
Are dogs allowed on the mountain trails such as cascade and porter mountain? We have a lab in good shape but didn't know if this was allowed and/or a wise thing to do.
#336 re: dogs on mountain trails (in reply-to message #335) Posted by Andrew on
Mon Sep 09, 07:34 EDT 2013

Hi.   

It is allowed, but the rules state that dogs must be leashed at all times. 

 ...Andrew 

#337 re: dogs on mountain trails (in reply-to message #336) Posted by tom on
Fri Oct 04, 20:06 EDT 2013

i know when i went up cascade a few days someone had a standard poodle on the cascade summit, cascade from cascade lakes should be easy for a fit dog, maybe a few sections that you would need to help a little dog up near the washouts, cascade summit may have a few harder steps for a dog

 - tons of pepole uptop always, kinda a tourist trap as far as high peaks go (easy climb to a 4k baldy under 5 miles rt), so it should be confertable around pepole

#338 Katahdin vs the aderondacks Posted by tom on
Fri Oct 04, 20:12 EDT 2013

what peaks in the Adirondacks have anything similar to katahdins difficulty? i went up helen taylor, across knife edge and down saddle.

 curious if theirs anything as hairy as that route

 

have done east dix, cascade and giant

#339 re: Katahdin vs the aderondacks (in reply-to message #338) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Oct 08, 10:39 EDT 2013

 The best example of something "hairy" would be a climb of Colden via the Trap Dike.   Other than that, the little bit of scrambling on the west side of Saddleback.

 More off the beaten track, there are many steep slide climbs. 

...Andrew 

#340 Posted by Waynald on
Tue Nov 19, 10:11 EST 2013
 Heading up to NY again this weekend. Is there a good source for current trail conditions like NETC? Also, does anyone have experience bushwacking from Iroquois over to Marshall?
#341 re: (in reply-to message #340) Posted by Andrew on
Tue Nov 19, 12:36 EST 2013

re: your second question: I have done bushwhacks from Cold Brook Pass to/from both Marshall and Iroquois.  You'll find several trip reports covering these outings on my Adirondacks page:

http://alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2009/02-15-ShepherdsTooth/

http://alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2013/08-17-ShepherdsTooth/  

http://alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/Marshall2003/

http://alavigne.net/Outdoors/ImageGallery/2006/04-09-Marshall/ 

 

  

#342 Posted by Waynald on
Tue Nov 19, 13:47 EST 2013
 Thanks Andrew. I'll let you know how we make out. Sounds a bit scrappy up to Marshall. 
#343 Corey's Road Posted by Tony Salvarezza on
Thu Nov 21, 13:16 EST 2013
I absolutely love your website!  I was wondering if you could tell me how you knew in advance about Corey's Road when you did Seymour and the rest of the Seward range in the winter?  As an aspiring Winter 46er I am dreading the thought of having to add the extra several miles just to get to the Summer Trailhead.
#344 re: Corey's Road (in reply-to message #343) Posted by Andrew on
Thu Nov 21, 18:28 EST 2013

I can't remember exactly... but I think it was from reading forum posts from other hikers on places like adkforum.com and views from the top. 

 ...Andrew 

#345 re: Corey's Road (in reply-to message #344) Posted by Tony Salvarezza on
Fri Nov 22, 09:49 EST 2013
Thanks for your reply.  I will check these sites out and hope for the best.
#346 Moose Mtn Posted by George on
Fri May 23, 16:16 EDT 2014
I hiked Moose Mountain in the seventies to a lean two on a lake bonny (I think the spelling is correct) Is that trail still open.
#347 re: Moose Mtn (in reply-to message #346) Posted by Andrew on
Sat May 24, 10:30 EDT 2014
Hmm.. never heard of it.   Where is Lake Bonny? 
#348 Best GPS device Posted by Steve Jebens on
Thu Aug 21, 10:16 EDT 2014
I love your site.  I only discovered the high peaks last summer as I was dropping off my daughter to hike with another family (she's 15). I brought my 12 year old and we hiked 3 peaks over the weekend (I'm now 52). My eldest now has 23 peaks and my youngest & I have 11 (after 8 this summer).

We are now looking at wandering a little farther off the beaten path and I think it is a good idea to be a little safer and have a GPS & know exactly where we are. I first had this feeling when we hiked  from the Ausable Club and did the Upper & Lower Wolf Jaw peaks and saw 7 other hikers in 9 hours!

 Can you recommend  a good choice - large screen & easy to learn would be my highest priorities.

 Thanks Steve 

#349 re: Best GPS device (in reply-to message #348) Posted by Andrew on
Thu Aug 21, 21:02 EDT 2014

Hi there.   Glad you like the site. 

I'm fairly sure any of the higher-end "mapping" GPSs by the big names (Lowrance, Garmin, Magellan) would do the trick.   I'm only familiar with Garmin units, so I can only comment on those.   I'd recommend something like the GPSMap 62 or 64.   There are several different variants of these particular models, some more expensive.   Even the least expensive of these models would suit your needs (I'm guessing around $300-ish).    

The 62 and 64 have button-based controls.  If you are more into a touchscreen interface, you can look at the Montana or Oregon series. 

 ...Andrew 

#350 Trip Idea Posted by Jim Latter on
Tue Aug 04, 16:28 EDT 2015
Hello,

 I am just starting my 46 peak journey and I would love to pick your collective brains for a trip idea.  Every year my family does a canoe camping trip in the Raquette River region and really enjoy ourselves.  Next year I was hoping to add a day hike to one of the 46 high peaks during the trip.  Does anyone know of a trip where we could canoe 5-10miles, camp at a lean to and do a day hike to a high peak?  I tried to search this type of trip but it doesn't seem to be a common combination.  Any help you can provide is greatly apprecaited.  

 

Thank you, 

 Jim 

#351 re: Trip Idea (in reply-to message #350) Posted by Andrew on
Mon Aug 10, 18:08 EDT 2015
Yeah, that's a tough one... the canoe routes and 46R peaks aren't typically close enough to each other to make such an idea practical.   Maybe something in the Henderson Lake area in conjunction with the/a peak of the Santanoni Range.   More research would have to be done, though...

Or, possibly a canoe on Lake Placid itself, to Whiteface Landing, followed by a climb of Whiteface.  That might work. 

Too bad that the AMR doesn't allow public canoeing and camping on Upper and Lower Ausable Lake - then that would be an option. 

#352 re: Trip Idea (in reply-to message #350) Posted by Jim Latter on
Wed Aug 26, 10:14 EDT 2015
Thanks for the tips, looks like we will just have to keep the trips seperate and do non-high peak hikes like St. Regis Mountain.  I have not become an expert on all that is the ADK, what is AMR and why do they allow you to canoe on the Ausable?

 

Thanks, 

 

Jim 

#353 re: Trip Idea (in reply-to message #352) Posted by Andrew on
Wed Aug 26, 19:00 EDT 2015

I assume you mean *not* canoe (in your response).    The AMR stands for the Adirondack Mountain Reserve - a slice of private land that occupies most of the Ausable Valley from route 73 all the up to and beyond upper Ausable Lake.   The AMR has been known recently for some fairly specific restrictions on hiking, access and usage of their land.  I'm pretty sure that canoeing is not allowed at all unless you are somehow part of the AMR.

...Andrew 

#354 re: Trip Idea (in reply-to message #353) Posted by Jim Latter on
Fri Aug 28, 10:52 EDT 2015
I did mean "not", Thank you for the information and enjoy this beautiful weekend! 
#355 re: Trip Idea (in reply-to message #354) Posted by Tom Kligerman on
Mon Apr 11, 10:23 EDT 2016
There is one high peak that is actually best climbed by a canoe trip start.  That is Whiteface and one paddles on Lake Placid, camps at the northeastern tip of Moose Island (there are even leantos here). In the morning, paddle across the lake to Whiteface landing and climb the peak (shortest way up Whiteface and very scenic). 
#356 re: Trip Idea (in reply-to message #355) Posted by Matthew Cole on
Wed May 04, 23:56 EDT 2016

Assuming it has to be a 46er, then you could do this canoe trip up the Upper Hudson, to the Opalescent River, and put out at the river crossing just before the destroyed footbridge... then hike up Allen Mountain.
 
Paddling the Upper Hudson and Opalescent Rivers 

If it doesn't have to be a 46er, St Regis of the Saranac 6 looks like you could canoe from Paul Smith to the trailhead. 

#357 GPS Posted by Scott on
Thu Jul 28, 16:26 EDT 2016

Andrew- I am wondering what handheld GPS unit you use? I am starting to research for a possible purchase. Currently, I upload your .gpx files into Backcountry Navigator on my smartphone. It works ok, but I deal with constant battery loss. Thank you.

#358 re: GPS (in reply-to message #357) Posted by Andrew on
Thu Jul 28, 22:27 EDT 2016

Hi there. 

Recently I've been using a Garmin GPSMap 64s.  I prefer physical buttons to a touch screen for this sort of application (ie - inclement conditions, etc), so that is why I went for this model instead of one of the other touchscreen-type models.

#359 re: GPS (in reply-to message #358) Posted by Scott on
Tue Aug 02, 08:32 EDT 2016
Thanks Andrew. I was looking at the 64st. I like the 4GB of extra space and the preloaded map. I too like the buttons instead of the touchscreen. Thanks again. Happy hiking!

 

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